Matthew’s New David at the End of Exile

A Socio-Rhetorical Study of Scriptural Quotations

Series:

Matthew crowds more Old Testament quotations and allusions into the prologue than anywhere else in his gospel. In this volume, Nicholas G. Piotrowski demonstrates the narratological and rhetorical effects of such frontloading. Particularly, seven formula-quotations constellate to establish a redemptive-historical setting inside of which the rest of the narrative operates. This setting is defined by Old Testament expectations for David’s great son to end Israel’s exile and rule the nations. Piotrowski contends that the rhetorical effect of this intertextual storytelling was to provide the Matthean community with an identity—in a contentious atmosphere—in terms of God’s historical design for the ages, now fulfilled in Jesus and his followers.
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Biographical Note

Nicholas G. Piotrowski, Ph.D. (2013), Wheaton College, teaches hermeneutics and New Testament at Crossroads Bible College and Indianapolis Theological Seminary. His other works on Matthew can be found in Tyndale Bulletin 64.1 (2013) and Bulletin for Biblical Research 25.2 (2015).

Review Quotes

"This study offers a welcome addition to the growing body of literature surrounding Matthew’s scriptural hermeneutic. Piotrowski’s careful analysis of scriptural source texts in their respective macro-contexts is commendable, just as his detection of an underlying hermeneutical coherence guiding Matthew’s handling of his source material is largely persuasive."
Max Botner, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Reviews of Biblical and Early Christian Studies, May 2017

"Piotrowski's study shows that there is still much undiscovered insight in the well-worn area of Matthew's formula quotations. He is a clear communicator and is to be highly commended for a creative and articulate study of Matthew's formula quotations."
H. Daniel Zacharias, Acadia Divinity College, Bulletin for Biblical Research 27.3

"Piotrowski’s book shows the Gospel of Matthew in a new way. The synchronous approach to the text proves to be a very effective method of literary criticism. Certainly the findings are very inspiring and open the field for further research."
Jacek Pietrzak OP, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland, BibAn 7/4 (2017)

"Piotrowski's study is a careful examination of the ways in which the OT texts create patterns for making sense of the events of Jesus's birth and early days. His study of the OT texts and especially their broader context illuminates Matthew's narratival purposes in significant ways."
Joshua Jipp, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, IL, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Table of contents

Contents

Foreword by Nicholas Perrin

1 Introduction

2 The Effect of Isaiah’s Narrative World in Matthew 1:18–25
Matthew 1:23 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 1:22–23
Isaiah 7:14 in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Isaiah

3 The Effect of Micah’s Narrative World in Matthew 2:1–12
Matthew 2:6 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 2:5–6
Micah 5:1, 3 in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Micah

4 Exile and David in the Late Second Temple Cultural Encyclopedia
A Taxonomy of Exile in the Late Second Temple Cultural Encyclopedia
End of Exile as a Davidic Hope in the Late Second Temple Cultural Encyclopedia
Returning to the Text of Matthew

5 The Effect of Hosea’s and Jeremiah’s Narrative Worlds in Matthew 2:13–21
Matthew 2:15, 18 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotations in Matthew 2:15, 17–18
Hosea 11:1 in Context
Jeremiah 31:15 [lxx 38:15] in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Hosea and Jeremiah

6 The Effect of the Prophets’ Narrative World in Matthew 2:22–23
The Narrative of Matthew 2:22–23
Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 2:23
The Provenance of the Ναζωραῖος
“The Prophets’ ” Expectation of the 161 נצֵֶר
Matthew’s Conversation with “the Prophets”

7 The Effect of Isaiah’s Narrative World in Matthew 3:1–4:11
The Unity of Matthew 2:22–4:12
Matthew 3:3 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 3:3
Isaiah 40:3 in Context
Matthew’s Conversation with Isaiah
Summary and Conclusion

8 The Effect of Isaiah’s Narrative World in Matthew 4:12–17
Matthew 4:15–16 in Context
The Narrative Function of the Formula-Quotation in Matthew 4:14–16
The Narrative of Isaiah 7:1–9:6 Revisited
Matthew’s Conversation with Isaiah

9 Conclusion
Summary
Coherency and Cogency
The Socio-Rhetorical Effect on Matthew’s Church

Appendix: The Source of Matthew’s Formula-Quotations
Bibliography
Index of Texts
Index of Modern Authors

Readership

Matthean specialists and all interested in New Testament intertextuality, narrative criticism and the origins of Christianity, as well as academic theological libraries and biblical scholars in general.