The White Spaces of Kenyan Settler Writing

A Polemical Bibliography

Series:

The White Spaces of Kenyan Settler Writing provides an overview of Kenyan literature by white writers in the half-century before Independence in 1964. Such literature has been over-shadowed by that of black writers to the point of critical ostracism. It deserves attention for its own sake, as the expression of a community that hoped for permanence but suffered both disappointment and dispossession. It deserves attention for its articulation of an increasingly desperate colonial and Imperial situation at a time when both were being attacked and abandoned in Africa, as in other colonies elsewhere, and when a counter-discourse was being constructed by writers in Britain as well as in Africa. Kenya was likely the best-known twentieth-century colony, for it attracted publicity for its iconic safaris and its Happy Valley scandals. Yet behind such scenes were settlers who had taken over lands from the native peoples and who were trying to make a future for themselves, based on the labour, willing or forced, of those people. This situation can be seen as a microcosm of one colonial exercise, and can illuminate the historical tensions of such times. The bibliography is an attempt to collect the literary resources of white Kenya in this historically significant period.

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Terrence Craig, Ph.D. (1982) University of Toronto, is Professor of English at Mount Allison University in Canada. He has published many articles on postcolonial literature, as well as Racial Attitudes in English-Canadian Fiction (1987) and The Missionary Lives (1997)
Introduction
1 Settler Literature: Non-Fiction
2 Settler Literature: Fiction and Poetry
3 Wildlife
4 Administrators
5 Missionaries
6 Travellers
7 Film and Television
Conclusion
Resources and Other Works Cited
Bibliography
Appendix
Index
Africanists in general, bibliographers, the sizeable community of 2nd generation of white Kenyan “refugees,” scholars of race relations.