The Library of Franeker University in Context, 1585–1843

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From 1585 to 1843, the Dutch town Franeker housed the University of Franeker. It had its peak in the seventeenth century and attracted students from Protestant countries throughout Europe. A library was founded right from the start and its collection has been preserved almost entirely. Eleven catalogues were printed in the course of its existence, and as a result the development of the collection can be examined chronologically.
The Library of Franeker University in Context, 1585–1843 discusses the relationship with education at Franeker University in detail, and makes a comparison with other similar libraries.

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Jacob van Sluis studied theology (Ph.D. 1988) and philosophy (Ph.D. 1997) at the University of Groningen. He has published studies and a bibliography of the former University of Franeker and a critical edition of François Hemsterhuis, Oeuvres Philosophiques (Brill, 2015).
Preface
Acknowledgments
List of Figures and Tables

Part 1 The Context



1 Franeker University, a Short History
 1 A Prestigious Foundation
 2 A Small, but Elegant and Not Unpleasant Town
 3 The Academic Community
 4 A Sense of Decline
 5 The Re-establishment as Athenaeum

2 The Four Faculties
 1 Theology
 2 Law
 3 Medicine
 4 Artes
 5 Conclusion

3 Modus Operandi
 1 Teaching and Learning
 2 Graduation
 3 Latin as an Academic Code

4 The Emergence of Public Libraries around 1600
 1 Bibliotheca Publica
 2 Catalogues
 3 Growth by Acquisition or by Agglomeration?

5 A Grand Tour along the New Libraries
 1 University Library, Leuven
 2 Bodleian Library, Oxford
 3 University Library, Cambridge
 4 Trinity College Library, Cambridge
 5 Trinity College Library, Dublin
 6 University Library, Leiden
 7 Bibliotheca Thysiana, Leiden
 8 University Library, Groningen
 9 Public Libraries in Dutch Towns
 10 German Libraries
 11 Conclusion

Part 2 The Franeker Library



6 Building a Library
 1 Filling the Empty Shelves
 2 1601, the First Printed Catalogue (Period I)
 3 The Observance of the Library Regulations

7 Curator Saeckma as Supervisor
 1 Around the 1626 Catalogue (Period II)
 2 A Private Collection Auctioned: Lubbertus
 3 Around the 1635 Catalogue (Period III)

8 A Breakthrough towards Modernity
 1 The 1644 Catalogue (Period IV)
 2 A Huge Theft
 3 Statutes
 4 Bookbinding

9 The Second Half of the Seventeenth Century
 1 The 1656 Catalogue (Period V)
 2 Profits and Expenses
 3 A Major Rearrangement and the 1691 Catalogue (Period VI)

10 Visitors and Testimonies
 1 Visitors from Abroad
 2 Testimonies about the Library Room

11 The 1713 Catalogue as a Landmark Halfway
 1 The 1713 Catalogue (Period VII)
 2 Rhenferd and the Hebrew Books
 3 Manuscripts, Incunables, and Other Imprints

12 The Changing Landscape, 1713–1811
 1 Acquisitions, 1713–1750
 2 The 1749 Catalogue (Period VIII)
 3 Frisian Athens
 4 The 1781 Catalogue (Period IX)
 5 Legatum Schurmannianum, I
 6 The Last Decades until 1811

13 The Athenaeum Years, 1815–1843 and Afterwards
 1 The Years between 1815 and 1843
 2 The Long Road to the 1842 Catalogue
 3 Preservation and Loss
 4 Delft
 5 Legatum Schurmannianum, II
 6 The 1854 Catalogue
 7 Final Score (Period X)
 8 Aftermath

14 Conclusion: The Value of the Library
 1 The University between Old and New
 2 The Library in Context of Other Academic Libraries
 3 The Library in Context of Franeker University

Appendix A: The Franeker Professors
Appendix B: The Franeker Librarians
Appendix C: An Overview of the Franeker University Library
Sources and Bibliography
Index
All interested in book history and the history of universities, academic libraries and sciences in the 16th-19th centuries.
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