The Arnhem Mystical Sermons

Preaching Liturgical Mysticism in the Context of Catholic Reform

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In The Arnhem Mystical Sermons: Preaching Liturgical Mysticism in the Context of Catholic Reform, Ineke Cornet presents the first in-depth study of this sermon collection from the canonnesses of St. Agnes in Arnhem. Through a careful analysis of sources and parallels, this book demonstrates how the sermons creatively integrate both Rhineland and Brabantine mysticism into a unique commentary on the liturgical year. The sermons, which contribute to the Catholic Reform, systematically explore the mystical celebration of the liturgy which underpins every aspect of the collection’s theology of inner ascent. Together with the Evangelical Pearl and the Temple of Our Soul, the sermons are part of a wider literary network that plays a significant part in the history of Dutch mysticism.
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Biographical Note

Ineke Cornet (1982) obtained her Ph.D. in Theology from the Catholic University Leuven and her Ph.D. of Arts in Literature from the University of Antwerp. She lectures at the Jesuit College of Spirituality, University of Divinity in Melbourne, Australia.

Table of contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Introduction

1 Introduction to the Arnhem Mystical Sermons
 1.1The Manuscript: Copy and Original
 1.2Audience of the Arnhem Mystical Sermons
 1.3Authorship of the Sermons
 1.4Function of the Arnhem Mystical Sermons
 1.5Context: The St. Agnes Monastery
 1.6Context: Sixteenth-Century Spirituality and Literary Networks

2 Textual and Conteptual Parallels with Ruusbroec and Eckhart
 2.1Ruusbroec and the Arnhem Mystical Sermons
 2.2Eckhart and the Arnhem Mystical Sermons

3 Parallels with Liturgical Mysticism
 3.1Sixteenth-Century Literary Networks
 3.2The Mystical Dimension of the Liturgy in the Pearl
 3.3The Mystical Dimension of the Liturgy in the Temple
 3.4A Textual Parallel between the Temple and the Arnhem Mystical Sermons
 3.5Tauler on the Inner Celebration of the Liturgy
 3.6The Institutiones Taulerianae and the Gaesdonck Treatises

4 The Mystical Understanding of the Liturgy
 4.1The Mystical Dimension of the Church Dedication Liturgy
 4.2The Inner Celebration of the Liturgy
 4.3Mystical Dimensions of the Scriptures and Liturgical Texts
 4.4Mystical Dimensions of Priesthood, Symbols, and the Eucharist
 4.5The Origins of the Genre of Liturgical Mysticism

5 The Structure of the Human Person and the Inner Ascent
 5.1The Structure of the Human Person and Ascent in the Church Dedication Sermon
 5.2The Tripartite Structure of the Human Person
 5.3The Inner Ascent and Imitation of Christ
 5.4The Concept of Spirit
 5.5The Concept of Ground
 5.6The Concepts of Mind and Memory
 5.7The Image of God in the Person

6 The Understanding of Union with God
 6.1Union with God in the Church Dedication Sermon
 6.2Attaining Union with God
 6.3Mutual Enjoyment and Experience of God
 6.4The Transformative Aspect of Union
 6.5Indistinct Union with God
 6.6Contemplating Trinity and Unity
 6.7Christocentrism and Christ’s Uniqueness
Appendix 1 Sermon 128 (fol. 286r–291r)
Appendix 2 Manuscripts from St. Agnes
Appendix 3 Hapax Legomena
Appendix 4 Texts in Marginal Decorations in the Arnhem Mystical Sermons
Bibliography
Index

Readership

All interested in the Arnhem mystical sermons and in the Dutch Late Medieval mystical tradition or sixteenth-century Church History.