The Unnamable Archipelago: Wounds of the Postcolonial in Postwar Japanese Literature and Thought

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In The Unnamable Archipelago: Wounds of the Postcolonial in Postwar Japanese Literature and Thought, Dennitza Gabrakova discusses how the island imagery in the works by Imafuku Ryūta, Ukai Satoshi, Ōba Minako, Ariyoshi Sawako, Hino Keizō, Ikezawa Natsuki, Shimada Masahiko and Tawada Yōko shapes a critical understanding of Japan on multiple intersections of trauma and sovereignty.
The book attempts an engagement with the vocabulary of postcolonial critique, while attending to the complexity of its translation into Japanese.
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Biographical Note

Dennitza Gabrakova, Ph. D. (2007), University of Tokyo, is a Senior Lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington. She is the author of The Dream of Weeds: Home and Hope in Modern Japan (in Japanese, Seori shobō, 2012) discussing the environmental poetics of development.

Table of contents

Contents

Introduction

1 Archipelagic Thought and Theory’s Gift

2 Translating Shame and the Wound of Ethnicity

3 Insular Hauntings: Trauma, Reproduction, and Island Doubles

4 Insular Negotiations: Sovereignty, Development, and Festivity

5 Islands of Translation

6 Islands of Trauma and Sovereignty

Conclusion: Towards the Sea of Islands

Bibliography

Index

Readership

All interested in Japanese literature from the 1960s on and the ways Japanese literary texts intersect with postcolonial critique.

Index Card

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