A Companion to Medieval Vienna

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Volume Editors: Susana Zapke and Elisabeth Gruber
This volume offers a comprehensive introduction to the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Vienna from c. 1100 to c. 1500. It provides a multidisciplinary view of the complexity of the vibrant city on the Danube. The volume is divided into four sections: Vienna, the city and urban design, politics, economy and sovereignty, social groups and communities, and spaces of knowledge, arts, and performance. An international team of eighteen scholars examines issues ranging from the city’s urban environment and art history, to economic and social concerns, using a range of sources and reflecting the wide array of possible approaches to the study of medieval Vienna today.

Contributors are: Peter Csendes, Ulrike Denk, Thomas Ertl, Christian Gastgeber, Thomas Haffner, Martha Keil, Franz Kirchweger, Heike Krause, Christina Lutter, Paul Mitchell, Kurt Mühlberger, Zoë Opačić, Ferdinand Opll, Barbara Schedl, Christoph Sonnlechner, and Peter Wright.

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Elisabeth Gruber, Ph.D. (2002), University of Salzburg, is Senior Scientist at the Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture, University of Salzburg. She has published a monograph, and a range of articles on medieval and urban History, including Kulturgeschichte der Überlieferung im Mittelalter, together with Ch. Lutter and O.J. Schmitt (Vienna, 2017).

Susana Zapke, Ph.D. (1993), University of Hamburg, Habilitation (2010) University of Salzburg, is Full Professor of Musicology at the University of Music and Arts of the City of Vienna. She is the project manager of several research projects on the Franco-Roman tradition, as well as on medieval and renaissance Vienna. She has published several monographs and articles, such as The Weitra Fragment: A Central European Source of Late Medieval Polyphony, together with Peter Wright ( Music & Letters, 2015) .
All interested in the history of medieval Vienna, in urban history, and in medieval central Europe.