Visualizing Coregency

An Exploration of the Link between Royal Image and Co-Rule during the Reign of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III

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In Visualizing Coregency, Lisa Saladino Haney explores the practice of co-rule during Egypt’s 12th Dynasty and the role of royal statuary in expressing the dynamics of shared power. Though many have discussed coregencies, few have examined how such a concept was expressed visually. Haney presents both a comprehensive accounting of the evidence for coregency during the 12th Dynasty and a detailed analysis of the full corpus of royal statuary attributed to Senwosret III and Amenemhet III. This study demonstrates that by the reign of Senwosret III the central government had developed a wide-ranging visual, textual, and religious program that included a number of distinctive portrait types designed to convey the central political and cultural messages of the dynasty.

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Lisa Saladino Haney, Ph.D. (2018), University of Pennsylvania, is an Egyptologist. Her main areas of research are Egypt’s Middle Kingdom and Egyptian interconnections with the Near East. She has published in the Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt.
Acknowledgements
List of Figures
Index of Plates
Abbreviations

1 Introduction
 1.1 Terminology
 1.2 The Literature of the Middle Kingdom
 1.3 The Cultural and Historical Context
 1.4 Methodology

2 The Institution of Coregency during the 12th Dynasty
 2.1 Conceptual and Chronological Concerns
 2.2 The Evidence
 2.3 Conclusions

3 The Development of Royal Statuary during the Early 12th Dynasty
 3.1 Background
 3.2 The Early 12th Dynasty
 3.3 The Statuary
 3.4 Conclusions

4 The Statuary of Senwosret III
 4.1 Previous Scholarship
 4.2 A New Look at the Statuary of Senwosret III
 4.3 Comparison with 2-Dimensional Representations of Senwosret III
 4.4 Conclusions

5 The Statuary of Amenemhet III
 5.1 Previous Scholarship
 5.2 A New Look at the Statuary of Amenemhet III
 5.3 Conclusions

6 Chronological Assessment
 6.1 The Sole-Reign of Senwosret III: the Early Style
 6.2 The Coregency of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III: the Later Style of Senwosret III/Early Coregency Style of Amenemhet III
 6.3 The Sole-Reign of Amenemhet III
 6.4 The Coregency of Amenemhet III and Amenemhet IV
 6.5 Conclusions

7 The Development of Religious Symbolism and Iconography in the Setting of Coregency: a Case Study
 7.1 Iconographic Developments: the Role of Dyads in the Visual Representation of Coregency
 7.2 Religious Developments: Osiris, Horus, and Divine Kingship

8 Conclusions
 8.1 The Practice of Coregency during the 12th Dynasty
 8.2 The Statuary of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III
 8.3 The Statuary of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III Revisited
 8.4 The Broader Significance

Appendix A: Catalogue of Royal Statuary Dated/Attributed to Senwosret III
 Group 1 – Inscribed, Primary Provenance Known
 Group 2 – Inscribed, Provenance Unknown
 Group 3 – Attributed Stylistically, Provenance Known
 Group 4 – Attributed Stylistically, Provenance Unknown
 Group 5 – Questionable Attribution, Likely Senwosret III
 Group 6 – Previously Proposed, Not Attributed Here to Senwosret III

Appendix B: Catalogue of Royal Statuary Dated/Attributed to Amenemhet III
 Group 1 – Inscribed, Provenance Known
 Group 2 – Inscribed, Provenance Unknown
 Group 3 – Attributed Stylistically, Provenance Known
 Group 4 – Attributed Stylistically, Provenance Unknown
 Group 5 – Questionable Attribution, Likely Amenemhet III
 Group 6 – Previously Proposed, but Not Attributed Here to Amenemhet III
Bibliography
Index
Plates
All interested in the politics, chronology, and material culture of ancient Egypt, particularly the Middle Kingdom, and anyone interested in Senwosret III, Amenemhet III, Egyptian art, royal portraiture, or kingship.