Discourse Markers in Sicily

A Synchronic, Diachronic, and Sociolinguistic Analysis

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When I entered her shop, my friend turned to me and said: «Arà, che si dice?» (‘Hey there, how you doing?’). This was not a full-fledged sentence in Italian, as she had thrown a little Sicilian word in – arà. It was a greeting, of course, but also a way of expressing her surprise at seeing me there, and a way of prompting me to start our conversation. The fact she used Sicilian had a clear meaning too: the vernacular indicates a shared social identity.
In a nutshell, this book analyses the cases of Sicilian arà and mentri to understand the complexity of discourse markers: what functions they perform, how they evolve historically, and what their social meaning is in a bilingual speech community.

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Giulio Scivoletto, Ph.D. (2019), University of Bergamo & University of Pavia, is a research fellow at the University of Catania, where he teaches Italian Sociolinguistics. His main research interests include semantic-pragmatic change, language contact, sociolinguistic variation, and educational linguistics.
Acknowledgements
List of Figures

Introduction

1 The Theoretical and Methodological Framework
 1.1 Discourse Markers (DM s) as a Research Object
 1.2 Methodology: Approach, Area, and Data of the Research

2 Synchronic Analysis
 2.1 The Case of arà
 2.2 The Case of mentri

3 Diachronic Analysis
 3.1 The Evolution of DM s: General Issues
 3.2 Reconstructing the Evolution of arà
 3.3 Reconstructing the Evolution of mentri

4 Sociolinguistic Analysis
 4.1 DM s and Language Contact in the Repertoire
 4.2 DM s and Social Meaning in the Community

Conclusion

Appendix 1: List of Diachronic Sources
Appendix 2: List of Transcription Symbols
Appendix 3: Socio-demographic Information About the Speakers (cf. § 4.2.1)
Bibliography
Index
This book is relevant to libraries and institutes, for the areas of languages and linguistics. It is intended for scholars and students interested in discourse markers and Romance languages.
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