Relationships between International Criminal Law and Other Branches of International Law

Series: 

This course investigates the relationships between international criminal law and other branches of international law. It begins by examining four issues of general international law: the principal sources of international law, jurisdiction and immunities, State responsibility, and use of force. It then explores internationalhumanitarian law, focusing on definitions of war crimes and difficulties in linking IHL and ICL. Next, it examines refugee law, paying particular attention to the exclusion of war criminals from refugee protection and to international crimes that may be related to the rights and treatment of refugees. The final chapter explores the relationship between ICL and human rights law, examining the position of human rights within the Rome Statute of the ICC, as well as the human rights aspects of genocide, crimes against humanity, various procedural rights relating to fair international trials and the contribution of human rights fact-finding mechanisms.

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William Schabas is Professor of International Law at Middlesex University London, and Professor Emeritus at Leiden University and the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is the author of important monographs on genocide, the International Criminal Court, the European Convention on Human Rights and the history of international law. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a member of the Royal Irish Academy and holds several honorary doctorates.
Chapter 1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 2. General international law. . . . . . . . . 25
2.1. Sources of international criminal law. . . . . 25
2.1.1. Treaty law.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.1.1.1. Presumption of non-retroactivity... . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.1.1.2. Principles of interpretation. . 38
2.1.2. Customary international law. . . . . . 44
2.1.3. General principles of law.. . . . . . . 59
2.1.4. Peremptory norms (jus cogens).. . . . 63
2.2. Jurisdiction and immunities. . . . . . . . . . 70
2.2.1. Jurisdiction – territorial, personal and universal.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
2.2.2. Immunities.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
2.3. State responsibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
2.4. Use of force.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Chapter 3. International humanitarian law. . . . . . 89
3.1. Defining war crimes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
3.2. Limitations on attacks and the conduct of hostilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
3.3. Asymmetric war crimes in non-international armed conflict.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Chapter 4. Refugee law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
4.1. Exclusion of war criminals.. . . . . . . . . . 126
4.2. International crimes, population transfer and refugee flows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Chapter 5. Human rights law and international criminal law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
5.1. The Rome Statute and Human Rights.. . . . 158
5.1.1. Internationally recognised human rights (Arts. 21 (3) and 69 (7) ) and fundamental rights (Art. 7 (1) (h) and 7 (2) (g) ).. . . . 160
5.1.2. Qualifications, nomination and election of judges (Arts. 36 (3) (b) (ii) ). . 169
5.1.3. Admissibility of evidence (Art. 69 (7) ). 171
5.2. International crimes and human rights.. . . . 174
5.2.1. The crime of genocide. . . . . . . . . 176
5.2.2. Crimes against humanity. . . . . . . . 183
5.3. Principle of legality.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
5.4. Fair trial rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
5.5. Penalties.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
5.6. Procedural obligation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
5.7. Commissions of Inquiry. . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Chapter 6. Conclusions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
About the Author.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Biographical note.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Principal publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250