Implications of Pre-emptive Data Surveillance for Fundamental Rights in the European Union

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In this work Julia Wojnowska-Radzińska offers a comprehensive legal analysis of various forms of pre-emptive data surveillance adopted by the European legislator and their impact on fundamental rights. It also identifies what minimum guarantees have to be set up to recognize pre-emptive data surveillance as a legitimate measure in a democratic society. The book aims to answer the essential question of how to strike the proper balance between fundamental rights and security interests in the digital age.

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Julia Wojnowska-Radzińska, Ph.D. (2012), is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law and Administration, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań (Poland). She is the author of academic publications in the fields of international human rights law.
Preface

Abbreviations

Introduction

1Nature and Extent of Pre-emptive Data Surveillance
 1 Defining Pre-emptive Data Surveillance, Its Origins and Importance

 2 Data Mining and Profiling

 3 Metadata


2The European Legal Framework for Retaining and Processing of Electronic Communications Metadata
 1 Introduction

 2 Background of the Retention of Electronic Communications Metadata

 3 Objective of the Data Retention Directive

 4 Annulment of the Data Retention Directive by the Court of Justice of the EU

 5 The Data Retention Saga after the Digital Rights Ireland Judgment
5.1 Introduction

5.2 Tele2 Sverige Judgment
5.2.1 Factual Background

5.2.2 Opinion of the Advocate General

5.2.3 The Judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU


5.3 Ministerio Fiscal Judgment
5.3.1 Factual Background

5.3.2 Opinion of the Advocate General

5.3.3 The Judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU


5.4 Privacy International Judgment
5.4.1 Factual Background

5.4.2 Opinion of the Advocate General

5.4.3 The Judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU


5.5 La Quadrature du Net and Ordre des Barreaux Francophones et Germanophone Judgment
5.5.1 Factual Background

5.5.2 Opinion of the Advocate General

5.5.3 Factual Background

5.5.4 Opinion of the Advocate General

5.5.5 The Judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU


5.6 H.K. v Prokuratur Judgment
5.6.1 Factual Background

5.6.2 Opinion of the Advocate General

5.6.3 The Judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU


5.7 The Data Retention Saga – Comments


3The European Legal Framework for Retaining and Processing of Flight Passenger Data
 1 Introduction

 2 Background of the pnr Data

 3 The EU-US Agreements Saga on the Processing and Transfer of pnr Data by Air Carriers
3.1 The First  ec - us pnr  Agreement

3.2 Challenges to the First  ec-us pnr  Agreement

3.3 The Temporary  pnr  Agreement and the 2007  pnr  Agreement

3.4 The Permanent EU-US  pnr  Agreement


 4 The EU-Canada pnr Agreements
4.1 Opinion 1/15 of the Court of Justice of the EU
4.1.1 Opinion of the Advocate General

4.1.2 Opinion of the Court of Justice of the EU

4.1.3 Comments


 5 The EU-Australia pnr Agreement

 6 The pnr Directive
6.1 Objective of the  pnr  Directive

6.2 Ligue des droits humains Judgment
6.2.1 Factual Background

6.2.2 Opinion of the Advocate General

6.2.3 The Judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU

6.2.4 Comments



4The European Legal Framework for Retaining and Processing of Financial Data within the Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme
 1 Introduction

 2 Concerns Arising from the Implementation of the tftp

 3 End of the swift Dispute

 4 The Second tftp Agreement

 5 Conclusion


5Pre-emptive Data Surveillance and Challenges for Fundamental Rights
 1 Introduction

 2 The Right to Privacy

 3 The Right to Data Protection

 4 The Presumption of Innocence

 5 The Prohibition of Discrimination

 6 The Freedom of Expression

 7 Conclusion


6What Minimum Safeguards Are Required?
 1 Introduction

 2 Principle of Proportionality
 2.1 Prescribed by Law

 2.2 The Necessity Requirement

 2.3 Balancing Fundamental Rights and Security Interests


 3 Oversight

 4 Conclusion


Conclusion

Bibliography

Index

The book will be principally of interest to legal experts working in human rights law i.e. EDPS, European Parliamentary Research Service staff members, FRA, government administrations, non-governmental organizations as well as researchers.
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