The Septuagint in Context

Introduction to the Greek Version of the Bible

The Septuagint, the first translation — or as Fernández Marcos points out, a “collection of translations”— of the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek figures prominently in both the history of Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity. In this second, revised edition of the successful Spanish translation, Natalio Fernández Marcos introduces readers to the origin of the Septuagint in its earliest versions (Aquila, Theodotian, and Symmachus) and traces the fundamental issues associated with Septuagint studies. This volume will certainly stand alongside classics in the field such as H. B. Swete’s Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek (1914), and to S. Jellicoe’s The Septuagint in Modern Study (1968). A well-rounded study, The Septuagint in Context affords readers insight into a variety of questions associated with the Septuagint, such as: What’s the relationship among the variety of versions? What was the Septuagint’s role in the religion of Hellenistic Judaism? What is the connection between the Septuagint and the New Testament? What is Lucian’s recension? What can the Septuagint tell us about the authority of sacred texts for those who used it? What import does the Septuagint have for text critical studies? For anyone trying to stay in touch with the inner worlds of Hellenistic Judaism and the New Testament, Septuagint in Context affords an indispensable connection.

This publication has also been published in hardback, please
click here for details.

Prices from (excl. VAT):

€64.00$82.00
Paperback
Natalio Fernández Marcos is a Research Professor at the Institute of Philology, where he served as Director from 1988 to 1992.
' This is a very valuable book for scholars and graduate students working in the field of patristics, Greek Bible versions, textual criticism of the Bible and Hellenistic Judaism.
A. Salvesen, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, 2002.
'...Fernández Marcos has put scholars and students alike around the world in his debt for such an authoritative and comprehensive introduction to the Septuagint.'
Peter J. Gentry, The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology, 2004.