Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Migration History x
  • All content x
Clear All

Series:

Edited by Luuk de Ligt and Laurens Ernst Tacoma

Until recently migration did not occupy a prominent place on the agenda of students of Roman history. Various types of movement in the Roman world were studied, but not under the heading of migration and mobility. Migration and Mobility in the Early Roman Empire starts from the assumption that state-organised, forced and voluntary mobility and migration were intertwined and should be studied together. The papers assembled in the book tap into the remarkably large reservoir of archaeological and textual sources concerning various types of movement during the Roman Principate. The most important themes covered are rural-urban migration, labour mobility, relationships between forced and voluntary mobility, state-organised movements of military units, and familial and female mobility.

Contributors are: Colin Adams, Seth G. Bernard, Christer Bruun, Paul Erdkamp, Lien Foubert, Peter Garnsey, Saskia Hin, Claire Holleran, Tatiana Ivleva, Luuk de Ligt, Elio Lo Cascio, Tracy L. Prowse, Saskia T. Roselaar, Laurens E. Tacoma, Rolf A. Tybout, Greg Woolf, and Andrea Zerbini.

Series:

Edited by Steinar A. Sæther

In Expectations Unfulfilled: Norwegian Migrants in Latin America, 1820-1940 scholars from Europe and Latin America study the experiences of workers, sailors, whalers, landowners, intellectuals and investors who migrated from Norway to Latin America during the age of mass migration. One recurrent theme is the absence of a large migratory stream from Norway to Latin America. In relative terms, Norwegian emigration was among the highest in Europe. Latin America was one of the principal receivers of migrants in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Why, then, did so few Norwegians end up in Latin America? Combining different levels of analysis, the authors explain how Norwegians experienced Latin America, and how their experiences were communicated to potential migrants at home.

Contributors are: María Alvarez Solar, Cecilia Alvstad, María Bjerg, Mieke Neyens, Synnøve Ones Rosales, Ricardo Pérez Montfort, Steinar A. Sæther and Ellen Woortmann.

Black Girls

Migrant Domestic Workers and Colonial Legacies

Series:

Sabrina Marchetti

In today’s Europe, migrant domestic workers are indispensable in supporting many households which, without their employment, would lack sufficient domestic and care labour. Black Girls collects and explores the stories of some of the first among these workers. They are the Afro-Surinamese and the Eritrean women who in the 1960s and 70s migrated to the former colonising country, the Netherlands and Italy respectively, and there became domestic and care workers. Sabrina Marchetti analyses the narratives of some of these women in order to powerfully demonstrate how the legacies of the colonial past have been, at the same time, both their tool of resistance and the reason for their subordination.

Proletarian and Gendered Mass Migrations

A Global Perspective on Continuities and Discontinuities from the 19th to the 21st Centuries

Series:

Edited by Dirk Hoerder and Amarjit Kaur

Proletarian and Gendered Mass Migrations connects the 19th- and 20th-century labor migrations and migration systems in global transcultural perspective. It emphasizes macro-regional internal continuities or discontinuities and interactions between and within macro-regions. The essays look at migrant workers experiences in constraining frames and the options they seize or constraints they circumvent. It traces the development from 19th-century proletarian migrations to industries and plantations across the globe to 20th- and 21st-century domestics and caregiver migrations. It integrates male and female migration and shows how women have always been present in mass migrations. Studies on historical development over time are supplemented by case studies on present migrations in Asia and from Asia. A systems approach is combined with human agency perspectives.

Contributors include Rochelle Ball, Shelly Chan, Dennis D. Cordell, Michael Douglass, Christiane Harzig, Dirk Hoerder, Muhamad Nadratuzzaman Hosen, Hassène Kassar, Kamel Kateb, Amarjit Kaur, Kiranjit Kaur, Gijs Kessler, Akram Khater, Elizabeth A. Kuznesof, Vera Mackie, Adam McKeown, Tomoko Nakamatsu, Ooi Keat Gin, Aswatini Raharto, Marlou Schrover, and Patcharawalai Wongboonsin.

Series:

Friedrich Lenger

In European Cities in the Modern Era, 1850-1914 Friedrich Lenger analyses the demographic and economic preconditions of European urbanization, compares the extent to which Europe’s cities were characterized by heterogeneity with respect to the social, national and religious composition of its population and asks in which way differences resulting from this heterogeneity were resolved either peacefully or violently.

Using this general perspective and extending the scope by including Eastern and Southern Europe the dominant view of Europe’s prewar cities as islands of modernity is challenged and the ubiquity of urban violence established as a central analytical problem.