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Un manuscrit trouvé à Dunhuang, traduit, commenté et annoté
L’Hymnaire manichéen chinois offre un ensemble de 25 hymnes destinées à la pratique de la religion manichéenne par la Section des Auditeurs. Mis au jour à Dunhuang (actuel Gansu) au début du 20ème siècle, après être resté enfoui dans une cache pendant quelque douze siècles, ce rouleau écrit en langue chinoise, comprend plusieurs hymnes transcrites de diverses langues courantes en Asie centrale à l’époque de sa rédaction.
Cette traduction apporte une vision nouvelle de la Religion de Lumière, telle qu’elle se vit adoptée par les Chinois, ainsi que de l’ampleur du message du prophète iranien Mani (216-276), aspirant à une portée universelle et destiné à relier entre eux les hommes de tous horizons de par le monde, quelque soit leur origine, leur langue ou leur histoire.



L’Hymnaire manichéen chinois presents a collection of twenty-five hymns that were intended for the Manichean religious practice of the class of Auditors. The scroll, which came to light in the early twentieth century in the province of Dunhuang (modern Ganzu) after lying buried for around twelve centuries, contains several hymns transcribed from a variety of languages that were current in Central Asia during the epoch of its redaction. This translation provides a new perspective on the Religion of Light as it was adopted in China, and on the wide reach of the message of the Iranian prophet Mani (216-276) that aimed at universal scope and was meant to unite people from all parts of the world, of whatever origin, language and history.
This book represents the first monograph-length study of the relationship between Protestant Bible translation and the development of Mandarin from a lingua franca into the national language of China. Drawing on both published and unpublished sources, this book looks into the translation, publication, circulation and use of the Mandarin Bible in late Qing and Republican China, and sets out how the Mandarin Bible contributed to the standardization and enrichment of Mandarin. It also illustrates that the Mandarin Union Version, published in 1919, was involved in promoting Mandarin as not only the standard medium of communication but also a marker of national identity among the Chinese people, thus playing a role in the nation-building of modern China.
Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2016 volume highlights the five sub-disciplines of theology. Wang Wei-fan’s evangelical theology and Christian ecumenism and its internal contradiction is studied from a systematic theological viewpoint. Additionally, a theology of soul and body is proposed as an approach of sinicization of Christianity. Civil Christian and political identity are also studied in the relation to the sinicization of Christianity in China. The belief logic and social actions of the “Kingdom-Got sect” and the origin of “A New Treatise on Aids to Administration” have been explored from the historical perspective. The meditations of the Three-Self Church by K. H. Ting from a socio-religious perspective, and the missionaries’ resolution of the term question in The Chinese Recorder have been studied in their relations to the Bible. There are comparative studies on the unreconciled religious diversity in the dialogue of civilizations and the different views about truth in Christianity and Confucianism. The academic report analyzes the eventful year of 2010 in the Catholic Church in China. This volume offers genuine Chinese theological research, which was previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

Contributors include: Juhong Ai, Jianming Chen and Tao Xiao, Xiaojuan Cheng, Xiangping Li, Gong Liang, Jianbo Huang, Paulos Huang, Meixiu Wang, Philip L. Wickeri, Kevin Xiyi Yao, Jie Zhao, Weichi Zhou.


Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed series on Chinese theology in English. Its main focus is on interdisciplinary, contextual, and cross-cultural studies in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. The Yearbook also features articles exploring wider issues in church and society. The Yearbook of Chinese Theology thus meets the growing demand for the study of the new academic discipline of Christianity in a Chinese context.

In this first volume, harmony and Sinicization of Christianity in China are studied from a systematic theological viewpoint. Confucian Ruism and the Human-God relationship are investigated from a practical theological perspective. Articles on the rebellious Taiping tianguo movement and on a Fujian Catholic community shed light on the history of Christianity in China, and two articles draw attention to the Bible in relation to literature and general public. Furthermore, a review of the Protestant Church is offered from the viewpoint of Civil Society construction, and Chinese contemporary ideology and historical Nestorianism are researched using methodology derived from the field of Comparative Religions. This volume offers genuine Chinese theological research, which was previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.