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Johannes Tromp

This volume contains the first critical edition of the Life of Adam and Eve in Greek, based on all available manuscripts. In the introduction the history of previous research is summarized, and the extant manuscripts are presented. Next comes a description of the grammatical characteristics of the manuscripts’ texts, followed by a detailed study of the genealogical relationships between them, resulting in a reconstruction of the writing’s history of transmission in Greek. On the basis of all this information, the Greek text of the Life of Adam and Eve in its earliest attainable stage, is established. The text edition is accompanied by a full critical apparatus, in which all relevant evidence from the manuscripts is recorded. Several indices complete this volume.

Mantikê

Studies in Ancient Divination

Edited by Sarah Iles Johnston and Peter T. Struck

This book thoroughly revisits divination as a central phenomenon in the lives of ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. It collects studies from many periods in Graeco-Roman history, from the Archaic period to the late Roman, and touches on many different areas of this rich topic, including treatments of dice oracles, sortition in both pagan and Christian contexts, the overlap between divination and other interpretive practices in antiquity, the fortunes of independent diviners, the activity of Delphi in ordering relations with the dead, the role of Egyptian cult centers in divinatory practices, and the surreptitious survival of recipes for divination by corpses. It also reflects a range of methodologies, drawn from anthropology, history of religions, intellectual history, literary studies, and archaeology, epigraphy, and paleography. It will be of particular interest to scholars and student of ancient Mediterranean religions.

Godly Fear

The Epistle to the Hebrews and Greco-Roman Critiques of Superstition

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Patrick Gray

To what extent was early Christianity viewed as superstition by its contemporaries? Superstition was the standard category in Greco-Roman antiquity for defaming “debased” religion, and to situate early Christianity in its Mediterranean milieu it is necessary to understand what this label meant to those who used it. Fear is the defining element of superstition according to writers like Plutarch, who regard the emotion as a fundamental human problem. Fear is likewise a recurring motif in the Epistle to the Hebrews, whose author holds up “confidence” as a Christian ideal yet also employs language which evokes fear in the starkest of terms. This work examines the articulation of Christian faith in Hebrews in the context of ancient debates about the propriety of fear.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

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Edited by Andrew. D Clarke, John Dillon and Jackson P. Hershbell

This volume presents the first modern English translation of Iamblichus’ De mysteriisalongside the standard critical edition of the text by Édouard Des Places (Les Belles Lettres, 1966). Iamblichus provides a unique insight into the mystical side of late Neoplatonism, arguing that the only good is union with the gods and that the only route to this divine union is theurgy—religious ritual demonstrating supernatural power. The process of sacrifice, the activities of angels and demons, the meaning of divine possession, and the functioning of oracles are all examined in this extraordinary defense of theurgic mysticism against contemporary critics such as Porphyry. Clarke, Dillon, and Hershbell bring this famous and fascinating text to light through their introduction and extensive notes.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Philostratus’s Heroikos

Religion and Cultural Identity in the Third Century C.E.

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Edited by Ellen Bradshaw Aitken and Jennifer K. Berenson Maclean

This multidimensional collection of essays explores the interrelation of religion, cultural identity, politics, literature, myth, and memory during the Roman Empire by focusing on the cultural dynamics embedded in and surrounding Philostratus’s Heroikos, an early third-century C.E. dialogue about Homer and the heroes of the Trojan War. The essays focus on ritual and literary dimensions of hero cult; cultural and community identity reflected in the Heroikos and in early Christianity; and the cultural, literary, and political turn toward heroes in the negotiation of difference, particularly with those outside the Roman Empire. Contributors to this volume include classicists, archaeologists, ancient historians, and scholars of early Christianity: Ellen Bradshaw Aitken, Susan E. Alcock, Hans Dieter Betz, Alain Blomart, Walter Burkert, Casey Dué, Simone Follet, Sidney H. Griffith, Jackson P. Hershbell, Christopher Jones, Jennifer K. Berenson Maclean, Francesca Mestre, Gregory Nagy, Corinne Ondine Pache, Jeffrey Rusten, M. Rahim Shayegan, James C. Skedros, and Tim Whitmarsh.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

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Martin C. Albl

This volume provides the first translation into any modern language of Pseudo-Gregory of Nyssa’s Testimonies against the Jews, a late fourth-century C.E. example of the scriptural testimonia genre. In this genre early Christians compiled biblical quotations, arranged under topical headings and accompanied by interpretive remarks, that functioned as "testimonies" in support of basic Christian beliefs and claims. In his notes Albl describes a unified yet flexible tradition that spread over the entire Mediterranean region, was expressed in Greek, Latin, and other languages, and flourished from the first century well beyond the fifth century. This volume, with Greek text and English translation on facing pages, will enable and stimulate greater interest and research in a neglected area of scholarship.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Progymnasmata

Greek Textbooks of Prose Composition and Rhetoric

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Edited by George Kennedy

The progymnasmata were fundamental to the teaching of prose composition and elementary rhetoric in European schools from the Hellenistic period to early modern times. George A. Kennedy, one of the world’s leading scholars of ancient rhetoric, provides in this volume an English translation of four Greek treatises written during the time of the Roman empire but studied throughout the Roman and Byzantine periods—works attributed to Theon, Hermogenes, Aphthonius, and Nicolaus. Also included in this important volume are translations of the fragments of Sopatros’ treatise as well as John of Sardis’ commentary on these exercises. Several of these works have never before been translated into English and are here made accessible to the general reader for the first time. The curriculum described in these works provided basic training in oral and written expression, but also inculcated cultural values and an understanding of the conventional literary forms—fable, narrative, chreia, ecphrasis, comparison, and so on—that were the building blocks of the epics, dramas, histories, and lyric poetry characteristic of the Greco-Roman period. The habits of thinking and writing learned in schools using the progymnasmata molded not only the secular literature of the Greeks and Romans, but also the writings of the early Christians through the patristic period.

Paperback edition available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

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Edited by Jennifer K. Berenson Maclean and Ellen Bradshaw Aitken

Philostratus’s On Heroes, only recently available in English translation, is a fictional dialogue set at the tomb of Protesilaos, the first hero to die in the Trojan War. Returning to life, Protesilaos reveals his insights about Homer, the Trojan War, its heroes, and their cults. The author of the Life of Apollonius of Tyana here molds heroic traditions to promote for his own day a renewed Greek cultural and religious outlook. The text’s lively and provocative interaction with Homer’s poems reveals that they are not fixed cultural artifacts but rather malleable symbols of religious and cultural identity. For those interested in religious practices, this text provides vivid and detailed descriptions of the workings of hero cults and explores issues of religious authority and revealed knowledge. With an insightful introduction and notes, an extensive glossary, maps, and topical bibliographies, Maclean and Aitken provide a volume that is indispensable for the study of Homer, heroes, literature, religion, and culture in the Roman Empire and Late Antiquity.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Jerusalem, Alexandria, Rome

Studies in Ancient Cultural Interaction in Honour of A. Hilhorst

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Edited by Florentino García Martínez and Gerard P. Luttikhuizen

The present volume has been compiled by colleagues and friends as a tribute to Dr. A. Hilhorst, the Secretary of the Journal for the Study of Judaism, on the occasion of his 65th birthday. Its 23 contributions by renowned international experts, reflect the various interests of the honouree, his approach to the Classical and Semitic languages and literatures as forming part of a continuum, and his attention to the interactions between the different literary corpora.
Several contributions deal with the interaction of the Old Testament with later Jewish, Gnostic, or Christian writings; others explore the influences of Greek writings within a Jewish context at the levels of philology, of theological ideas, of realia, or of influence of literary compositions. Furthermore, a number of contributions centers on the interaction of Greek motives in Jewish and Christian literature, whereas in several others the focus is on the Martyrium literature or on early Christian texts.

Trophonios de Lébadée

Cultes et mythes d'une cité béotienne au miroir de la mentalité antique

Series:

Pierre Bonnechere

The oracle of Trophonios at Lebadeia (Boiotia), among the best documented in Greece, was active from the archaic period to the third century AD. At this oracle, divine revelation was given in the form of a ‘visionary trance’, experienced as a psychic journey or leap of the soul into the world of truth. From the beginning, the cult and legend of Trophonios (and of similar heroes) turned upon the boundary between ‘the other world’ and the here-and-now, and were intimately linked with psychagogy, divination (including iatromancy), and the mysteries. The analysis of each of the oracle's components in the light of ancient mentalities has broadened our understanding of both Trophonios and of Greek divination in general.