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Adam Knobler

This book examines the relationship between medieval European mythologies of the non-Western world and the initial Portuguese and Spanish voyages of expansion and exploration to Africa, Asia and the Americas. From encounters with the Mongols and successor states, to the European contacts with Ethiopia, India and the Americas, as well as the concomitant Jewish notion of the Ten Lost Tribes, the volume views the Western search for distant, crusading allies through the lens of stories such as the apostolate of Saint Thomas and the stories surrounding the supposed priest-king Prester John. In doing so, Knobler weaves a broad history of early modern Iberian imperial expansion within the context of a history of cosmologies and mythologies.

Ports of Globalisation, Places of Creolisation

Nordic Possessions in the Atlantic World during the Era of the Slave Trade

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Edited by Holger Weiss

This anthology addresses and analyses the transformation of interconnected spaces and spatial entanglements in the Atlantic rim during the era of the slave trade by focusing on the Danish possessions on the Gold Coast and their Caribbean islands of Saint Thomas, Saint Jan and Saint Croix as well as on the Swedish Caribbean island of Saint Barthélemy. The first part of the anthology addresses aspects of interconnectedness in West Africa, in particular the relationship between Africans and Danes on the Gold Coast. The second part of this volume examines various aspects of interconnectedness, creolisation and experiences of Danish and Swedish slave rules in the Caribbean.

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Edited by Pamela A. Patton

Envisioning Others offers a multidisciplinary view of the relationship between race and visual culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking world, from the kingdoms of Spain and Portugal to colonial Peru and Colombia, post-Independence Mexico, and the pre-Emancipation United States. Contributed by specialists in Latin American and Iberian art history, literature, history, and cultural studies, its ten chapters take a transnational view of what ‘race’ meant, and how visual culture supported and shaped this meaning, within the Ibero-American sphere from the late Middle Ages to the modern era. Case studies and regionally-focused essays are balanced by historiographical and theoretical offerings for a fresh perspective that challenges the reader to discern broad intersections of race, color, and the visual throughout the Iberian world.
Contributors are Beatriz Balanta, Charlene Villaseñor Black, Larissa Brewer-García, Ananda Cohen Suarez, Elisa Foster, Grace Harpster, Ilona Katzew, Matilde Mateo, Mey-Yen Moriuchi, and Erin Kathleen Rowe.

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Robert H. Jackson

Beginning in 1609, Jesuit missionaries established missions (reductions) among sedentary and non-sedentary native populations in the larger region defined as the Province of Paraguay (Rio de la Plata region, eastern Bolivia). One consequence of resettlement on the missions was exposure to highly contagious old world crowd diseases such as smallpox and measles. Epidemics that occurred about once a generation killed thousands. Despite severe mortality crises such as epidemics, warfare, and famine, the native populations living on the missions recovered. An analysis of the effects of epidemics and demographic patterns shows that the native populations living on the Paraguay and Chiquitos missions survived and retained a unique ethnic identity. A comparative approach that considers demographic patterns among other mission populations place the case study of the Paraguay and Chiquitos missions into context, and show how patterns on the Paraguay and Chiquitos missions differed from other mission populations. The findings challenge generally held assumptions about Native American historical demography.

Networks and Trans-Cultural Exchange

Slave Trading in the South Atlantic, 1590-1867

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Edited by David Richardson and Filipa Ribeiro da Silva

Winner of the 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

Studies of the South Atlantic commercial world typically focus on connections between Angola and Brazil, and specifically on the flows of enslaved Africans from Luanda and the relations between Portuguese-Brazilian traders and other agents and their local African and mulatto trading partners. While reaffirming the centrality of slaving activities and of the networks that underpinned them, this collection of new essays shows that there were major Portuguese-Brazilian slave-trading activities in the South Atlantic outside Luanda as well as the Angolan-Brazil axes upon which historians usually focus. In drawing attention to these aspects of the South Atlantic commercial world, we are reminded that this was a world of change and also one in which Portuguese-Brazilian traders were unable to sustain in the face of competition from northern European rivals the dominant position in slave trading in Atlantic Africa that they had first established in the sixteenth century.

Geweld in de West

Een militaire geschiedenis van de Nederlandse Atlantische wereld, 1600-1800

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Edited by Victor Enthoven, Henk den Heijer and Han R. Jordaan

In Geweld in de West bieden tien auteurs onder redactie van Victor Enthoven, Henk den Heijer en Han Jordaan een overzicht van het Nederlandse militaire optreden in het Atlantische gebied tussen 1600 en 1800. De verovering van Indiaanse gebieden, de strijd tussen rivaliserende Europese machten en de gewelddadige slavenhandel zijn diep verankerd in de Atlantische geschiedenis. Ook Nederland heeft daaraan zijn steentje bijgedragen, maar daar is weinig over bekend. In dit boek worden diverse aspecten van die militaire aanwezigheid belicht. Zo wordt de inzet van niet-Nederlandse strijdkrachten overzee beschreven en wordt ingegaan op gewelddadige excessen die zich hebben afgespeeld. De thema’s militaire organisaties, militaire expedities en militaire cultuur vormen het hart van deze Atlantische studie.

The Conspiracy of the Ninth Duke of Medina Sidonia (1641)

An Aristocrat in the Crisis of the Spanish Empire

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Luis Salas Almela

In The Conspiracy of the Ninth Duke of Medina Sidonia, Luis Salas offers a penetrating analysis of a plot to incite rebellion in the region of Andalusia in 1641. Had it succeeded, the plan could have caused the collapse of the Spanish Monarchy. Salas leaves no doubt that the conspiracy indeed occurred; he analyzes the plan in depth, its architects, its supporters — both in Andalusia and abroad — how it unraveled, and how the government of Philip IV of Spain managed to survive the most dramatic months of his tumultuous reign. Salas also delves into the consequences of the subsequent punishments, which affected Portugal, the balance of power in Andalusia, and Spain’s entire colonial trade.

Gendered Crime and Punishment

Women and/in the Hispanic Inquisitions

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Stacey Schlau

In Gendered Crime and Punishment, Stacey Schlau mines the Inquisitional archive of Spain and Latin America in order to uncover the words and actions of accused women as transcribed in the trial records of the Holy Office. Although these are mediated texts, filtered through the formulae and norms of the religious institution that recorded them, much can be learned about the prisoners’ individual aspirations and experiences, as well as about the rigidly hierarchical, yet highly multicultural societies in which they lived. Chapters on Judaizing, false visions, possession by the Devil, witchcraft, and sexuality utilize case studies to unpack hegemonic ideologies and technologies, as well as individual responses. Filling in a gap in our understanding of the dynamics of gender in the early modern/colonial period, as it relates to women and gender, the book contributes to the growing scholarship in Inquisition cultural studies.