Browse results

Series:

Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas, Eftychia Stavrianopoulou and Rolf Tybout

SEG LXIV covers the publications of the year 2014, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2013 but pertaining to material from 2014.

Series:

Gertjan Verhasselt

This book is the first volume to appear in print since 1999 in Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Continued, which continues Felix Jacoby’s monumental but uncompleted collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It is part of section IV B (History of Literature, Music, Art and Culture) and provides a critical edition, translation and commentary of the fragments of Dikaiarchos, a pupil of Aristotle from late fourth century BCE. Dikaiarchos wrote about cultural history, literature, philosophers, politics, geography, ethics and the soul. The book advances the state of the art by presenting a new text and demarcation of the fragments, a study of the method of the authors citing Dikaiarchos, new readings and interpretations of the fragments and a reassessment of Dikaiarchos’ value as a historian.

Hieratic, Demotic and Greek Studies and Text Editions

Of Making Many Books There Is No End: Festschrift in Honour of Sven P. Vleeming

Series:

Edited by Cary J. Martin, Francisca A.J. Hoogendijk and Koenraad Donker van Heel

This volume is a Festschrift in honour of Sven Vleeming containing the contributions of thirty-eight friends and colleagues, often renowned specialists in their respective fields. It includes the editions of fifty-four new texts from Ancient Egypt that date from the 7th century BCE to the 2nd century CE and covers a very wide range of subjects in (Abnormal) Hieratic, Demotic and Greek papyrology. As such, it reflects the equally wide range of knowledge of the scholar to whom this book is dedicated.

Series:

Edited by Various Authors & Editors

This set of 8 volumes contains the first 25 SEG volumes from the start in 1923 till 1976, as well as the index to volumes 11-20.

A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex)

Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 14, ب to بين

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex)

Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 13, بيت TO بين

Series:

Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.

Series:

Conor Whately

In Battles and Generals: Combat, Culture, and Didacticism in Procopius’ Wars, Whately reads Procopius’ descriptions of combat through the lens of didacticism, arguing that one of Procopius’ intentions was to construct those accounts not only so that they might be entertaining to his audience, but also so that they might provide real value to his readership, which was comprised, in part, of the empire’s military command. In the course of this analysis we discover that the varied battles and sieges that Procopius describes are not generic; rather, they have been crafted to reflect the nature of combat – as understood by Procopius – on the three fronts of Justinian’s wars, the frontier with Persia, Vandal north Africa, and Gothic Italy.

Series:

Daniel F. Callahan

The tenth and eleventh centuries are pivotal for the history of the West. The writings of Ademar of Chabannes, many of which are still unpublished, offer numerous insights into why these changes were occurring. Because his promotion of the cult of St. Martial of Limoges contains much that is exaggerated or even untrue, his writings have been viewed with suspicion. What this book seeks to do is make clear that such distrust is justified, but that there is much material in those manuscripts throwing light on the origins of the crusades, the rise of heresy, the great feudal warfare and the reality of apocalyptic fear.

Series:

Manuel López-Muñoz

Preaching is more than just speaking in public. The persuasion of people and the theory underlying it are precedents of modern propaganda. In his Rhetorica Ecclesiastica, Agostino Valier (1531-1606) outlines what a Catholic preacher should know before he is allowed to deliver his sermons. Closely related to Cardinal Charles Borromeo's entourage and to the directions emanating from the Council of Trent, this treatise was considered to be one of the most influential ones back in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and soon became a must for seminaries all over the world. After introducing Valier and the editorial approach he used, Manuel López-Muñoz offers a critical edition of the text aiming to recover the treatise and make it available to modern scholars.