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Edited by Sijmen Tol and René Genis

Within international linguistics, the study of Slavic languages enjoys considerable interest. The extensive coverage of Slavic languages in the Linguistic Bibliography is evidence of this. The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics, 2000-2014 brings together the details of over 67,000 unique publications, carefully selected, classified, cross-referenced and indexed by professional bibliographers: it gives a complete overview of the field of studies since the beginning of this century. All contributing bibliographers are specialized Slavists themselves, guaranteeing the quality of the descriptions and annotations. The selection includes over thirty publication languages including publications in Finnish, Estonian, Greek, Albanian, Dutch, English, German, Japanese, Hebrew as well as other languages. Marc L. Greenberg’s Introduction gives an overview of the state of scholarship in Slavic linguistics and the directions in which the field is headed. The 3 volumes are thematically and geographically ordered in the sections General, Slavic, South Slavic, West Slavic and East Slavic. All references are classified according to a sophisticated classification scheme (over 100 subject classes), refined with an extensive language and subject keyword index.
Key features:
• Over 67,000 records;
• Covering all Slavic languages including minor and even extinct ones e.g. Bosnian, Pomeranian, Rusyn, High and Low Sorbian as well as Church Slavonic;
• Titles are given in their original languages, with translations provided whenever relevant;
• Titles in Cyrillic script are uniformly transcribed in Latin script according to current scientific standards.

Series:

Janneke Weijermars

The United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815-1830) was a creation of the Congress of Vienna, where the map of Europe was redrawn following Napoleon’s defeat. Dutch language and literature were considered the essential tools to smoothly fuse the North and South – today, the Netherlands and Belgium respectively. King Willem I tried a variety of measures to stimulate and control literary life in the South, in an effort to encourage unity throughout his kingdom.

Janneke Weijermars describes the driving force of this policy and especially its impact in the South. For some authors, Northern Dutch literature represented the standard to which they aspired. For others, unification triggered a desire to assert their own cultural identity. The quarrels, mutual misunderstandings and subsequent polemics were closely intertwined with political issues of the day. Stepbrothers views the history of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands through a literary lens.

Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems

mit der kommentierten Belegsammlung der Aoristformen und Formen des präteritalen passiven Partizipiums im Altkirchenslavischen

Series:

Katja Ackermann

Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems proposes a new look on the paradigmatic organization of the finite verb in Proto-Slavic. It rests on the study of the diachronic and synchronic conditioning of paradigmatic preferences of Proto-Slavic primary verbs and is shown to account for the complementary distribution of partially syncretistic aorist stem formations into six classes (bases of the systematic description adopted here). Major development trends reveal clear parallels with other Indo-European branches. Along with the discussion of paradigmatic constellations, diachronic background, etymology and grammar, the work comprises a nearly complete attestation of aorists and past participles of primary verbs including prefixal compounds in canonic OCS and those outside the canon, and is designed as an extensive reference book both for Indo-Europeanists and Slavists.

Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems bietet eine neue systematische Beschreibung des älteren gemeinslavischen Verbalsystems aus synchroner und diachroner Perspektive. Im Zentrum steht die nahezu vollständige Erfassung und Bewertung der Aoristformen des Altkirchenslavischen. Sie erscheinen hier in neuer paradigmatischer Klassifikation (in sechs Klassen), mit ausführlicher Dokumentation ihrer Beleglage und ihrer synchronischen Oppositionen (: Präsens- und Infinitivstämmen, Partizipien). Die systematische und historische Konditionierung der paradigmatischen Präferenzen primärer Verbalstammbildungen wird neu beleuchtet.
Ihre sprachgeschichtliche Verankerung wird im Vergleich mit inner- und außerslavischen Entsprechungen nach dem aktuellen Stand – unter Einschluss der Prosodie – dargestellt. Das Buch eignet sich als Referenzorgan zum slavischen Verbum für Slavisten, Indoeuropäisten und allgemeine Sprachwissenschaftler.

Series:

Walter K. Hanak

In The Nature and the Image of Princely Power in Kievan Rus', 980-1054, Walter K. Hanak offers a critical analysis of the annalistic, literary, and other works that provide rich if conflicting and contradictory information on the nature of princely power and their image or literary representations. The primary sources demonstrate an interaction between the reality and the notions concerning princely power and how this power generates an image of itself. The author also analyses the textual incongruities that appear to be a reflection of a number of currents -- Byzantine, Varangian, Khazar, and Eastern Slavic. The secondary sources provide a variety of interpretations, which Hanak seeks to uphold and dispute. His stress, however, is to view this evidence in the light of a newly Christianized state and the launching of a maturative process in its early history.

Fairy Tales and True Stories

The History of Russian Literature for Children and Young People (1574 - 2010)

Series:

Ben Hellman

Russian literature for children and young people has a history that goes back over 400 years, starting in the late sixteenth century with the earliest alphabet primers and passing through many different phases over the centuries that followed. It has its own success stories and tragedies, talented writers and mediocrities, bestsellers and long-forgotten prize winners. After their seizure of power in 1917, the Bolsheviks set about creating a new culture for a new man and a starting point was children's literature. 70 years of Soviet control and censorship were succeeded in the 1990s by a re-birth of Russian children's literature. This book charts the whole of this story, setting Russian authors and their books in the context of translated literature, critical debates and official cultural policy.

Series:

Edited by Alexei Lalo

This concise reader/anthology of Russian and Soviet erotic prose written between 1900 and 1940 consists of three parts: Silver Age writings, interwar émigré literature, and early Soviet fiction. It was not the author’s intention to select the most accomplished works dedicated to the theme of sexuality and eroticism. Rather, the choice for the most part fell upon texts previously unavailable in English and thus less known to readers who do not read in Russian. In addition, these works give a good idea of how the “birth of the body” in Russian literature and culture actually happened and of the laborious, difficult nature of this birth.

Western Crime Fiction Goes East

The Russian Pinkerton Craze 1907-1934

Series:

Boris Dralyuk

This book examines the staggering popularity of early-twentieth-century Russian detective serials. Traditionally maligned as “Pinkertonovshchina,” these appropriations of American and British detective stories featuring Nat Pinkerton, Nick Carter, Sherlock Holmes, Ethel King, and scores of other sleuths swept the Russian reading market in successive waves between 1907 and 1917, and famously experienced a “red” resurgence in the 1920s under the aegis of Nikolai Bukharin. The book presents the first holistic view of “Pinkertonovshchina” as a phenomenon, and produces a working model of cross-cultural appropriation and reception. The “red Pinkerton” emerges as a vital “missing link” between pre- and post-Revolutionary popular literature, and marks the fitful start of a decades-long negotiation between the regime, the author, and the reading masses.

Series:

Rick Derksen

This dictionary in the Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series systematically and exhaustively deals with the Slavic inherited lexicon. It is unique in combining recent insights from the field of comparative Indo-European linguistics with modern Balto-Slavic accentology. In addition, the author makes an explicit attempt at reconstructing part of the Balto-Slavic lexicon.
The entries of the dictionary are alphabetically arranged Proto-Slavic etyma. Each lemma consists of a number of fields which contain the evidence, reconstructions and notes. The introduction explains the contents and the significance of the individual fields. Here the reader can also find information on the various sources of the material. The volume concludes with an extensive bibliography of sources and secondary literature, and a word index.

On the Nature of the Syntax-Phonology Interface

Cliticization and Related Phenomena

Series:

Željko Bošković

The theoretical domain of investigation of this volume is the nature of the syntax-phonology interface. The empirical domain of investigation is cliticization in South Slavic. The volume also examines several phenomena that raise theoretical issues related to those involved in South Slavic cliticization, namely, multiple wh-fronting in Slavic and Romanian, Germanic V-2, object shift and stylistic fronting in Scandinavian, and negation in Romance. The central theoretical questions considered in the volume are how syntax and phonology interact with each other and whether PF can affect word order. It is argued that PF does affect word order, but not through actual PF movement. The volume makes new proposals concerning the structural representation of clitics and the nature of clitic clustering. It also provides an account of the second position effect and teases apart the role of syntax and phonology in cliticization and the second position phenomenon.

Russia

Essays in history and literature

Legters