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Religious Transformation in Modern Asia

A Transnational Movement

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Edited by David Kim

This volume explores the religious transformation of each nation in modern Asia. When the Asian people, who were not only diverse in culture and history, but also active in performing local traditions and religions, experienced a socio-political change under the wave of Western colonialism, the religious climate was also altered from a transnational perspective. Part One explores the nationals of China (Taiwan), Hong Kong, Korea, and Japan, focusing on the manifestations of Japanese religion, Chinese foreign policy, the British educational system in Hong Kong in relation to Tibetan Buddhism, the Korean women of Catholicism, and the Scottish impact in late nineteenth century Korea. Part Two approaches South Asia through the topics of astrology, the works of a Gujarātī saint, and Himalayan Buddhism. The third part is focused on the conflicts between ‘indigenous religions and colonialism,’ ‘Buddhism and Christianity,’ ‘Islam and imperialism,’ and ‘Hinduism and Christianity’ in Southeast Asia.

Sacred Space in the Modern City

The Fractured Pasts of Meiji Shrine, 1912-1958

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Yoshiko Imaizumi

Sacred Space in the Modern City offers strikingly new and original perspectives on a number of controversial issues and important questions concerning Japanese pre- and post-war ideology and identity. Meiji shrine is not just ‘a’ shrine; it is ‘the’ shrine of twentieth-century Japan. This book is also noteworthy on account of its use of previously untouched archival materials as well as for its broad range of theoretical approaches applied within a multidisciplinary context. The author uses Meiji shrine as a lens with which to investigate the nature of the society that created, experienced and reproduced this site. This long-overdue study will be widely welcomed by researchers interested in Shinto and Meiji Japan, as well as the wider readership wishing to access the social history of Taisho and early Showa Japan.

A Few Poorly Organized Men

Interreligious Violence in Poso, Indonesia

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Dave McRae

Despite no prior history of recent unrest, Poso, from 1998-2007, became the site of the most protracted inter-religious conflict in postauthoritarian Indonesia, as well as one of the most important theatres of operations for the Jemaah Islamiyah terrorist network. Nine years of violent conflict between Christians and Muslims in Poso elevated a previously little known district in eastern Indonesia to national and global prominence. Drawing on a decade of research, for the most part conducted while the conflict was ongoing, this book provides the first comprehensive history of this violence. It also addresses the puzzle of why the Poso conflict was able to persist for so long in an increasingly, stable democratic state, despite the manifest weaknesses of the small groups of men driving the violence.