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Author: Rainer Liedtke
Wie »jüdisch« waren wirtschaftliche Aktivitäten von Juden?
Ausgehend von dieser Leitfrage stellt der Band dar, wie sich die Berufsfelder, die ökonomische Lage und das wirtschaftliche Handeln von Juden seit dem 18. Jahrhundert veränderten und welche Auswirkungen dies auf ihre Integration in die Gesamtgesellschaft hatte. Durch einen Blick auf jüdische Wohltätigkeit und Philanthropie werden die Ungleichheiten des rapiden wirtschaftlichen Aufstiegs des jüdischen Bürgertums seit der Mitte des 19. Jahrhundert betrachtet. Dieser Aufstieg steht in einem starken Kontrast zu den zahlreichen Anfeindungen aufgrund angeblicher wirtschaftlicher jüdischer Dominanz, die ebenso thematisiert werden wie die Ausplünderung der Juden im Nationalsozialismus. Der Band schließt mit einer Darstellung der sogenannten Wiedergutmachung und der Probleme bei der Restitution jüdischer Vermögen. Auch die Entwicklung der Wirtschaftsbeziehungen zwischen Israel und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland wird thematisiert.
Author: Amanda Jo Coles
The Romans founded colonies throughout Italy and the provinces from the early Republic through the high Empire. Far from being mere ‘bulwarks of empire,’ these colonies were established by diverse groups or magistrates for a range of reasons that responded to the cultural and political problems faced by the contemporary Roman state and populace. This project traces the diachronic changes in colonial foundation practices by contextualizing the literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and numismatic evidence with the overall perspective that evidence from one period of colonization should not be used analogistically to explain gaps in the evidence for a different period. The Roman colonies were not necessarily ‘little Romes,’ either structurally, juridically, or religiously, and therefore their role in the spread of Roman culture or the exercise of Roman imperialism was more complex than is sometimes acknowledged.
Nationalism, as an ideology coupling self-conscious peoples to fixed territories, is often seen as emerging from European historical developments, also in postcolonial countries outside Europe. André van Dokkum’s Nationalism and Territoriality in Barue and Mozambique shows that this view is not universally true. The precolonial Kingdom of Barue in what is now Mozambique showed characteristics generally associated with nationalism, giving the country great resilience against colonial encroachment. Postcolonial Mozambique, on the other hand, has so far not succeeded in creating national coherence. The former anti-colonial organization and now party in power Frelimo has always stressed national unity, but only under its own guidance, paradoxically producing disunity.
A Study of the Evidence from Italy, North Africa and Palestine A.D. 285-700
Author: Sadi Maréchal
In this book Sadi Maréchal examines the survival, transformation and eventual decline of Roman public baths and bathing habits in Italy, North Africa and Palestine during Late Antiquity. Through the analysis of archaeological remains, ancient literature, inscriptions and papyri, the continued importance of bathhouses as social hubs within the urban fabric is demonstrated, thus radically altering common misconceptions of their decline through the rise of Christianity and elite seclusion. Persistent ideas about health and hygiene, as well as perpetuating ideas of civic self-esteem, drove people to build, restore and praise these focal points of daily life when other classical buildings were left to crumble.
Author: Mark Humphries
The last half century has seen an explosion in the study of late antiquity, which has characterised the period between the third and seventh centuries not as one of catastrophic collapse and ‘decline and fall’, but rather as one of dynamic and positive transformation. Yet research on cities in this period has provoked challenges to this positive picture of late antiquity. This study surveys the nature of this debate, examining problems associated with the sources historians use to examine late antique urbanism, and the discourses and methodological approaches they have constructed from them. It aims to set out the difficulties and opportunities presented by the study of cities in late antiquity in terms of transformations of politics, the economy, and religion, and to show that this period witnessed very real upheaval and dislocation alongside continuity and innovation in cities around the Mediterranean.
Insatiable Appetite: Food as Cultural Signifier in the Middle East and Beyond explores the cultural ramifications of food and foodways in the Mediterranean, and Arab-Muslim countries in particular. The volume addresses the cultural meanings of food from a wider chronological scope, from antiquity to present, adopting approaches from various disciplines, including classical Greek philology, Arabic literature, Islamic studies, anthropology, and history. The contributions to the book are structured around six thematic parts, ranging in focus from social status to religious prohibitions, gender issues, intoxicants, vegetarianism, and management of scarcity.

Contributors are: Tarek Abu Hussein, Yasmin Amin, Kevin Blankinship, Tylor Brand, Kirill Dmitriev, Eric Dursteler, Anny Gaul, Julia Hauser, Christian Junge, Danilo Marino, Pedro Martins, Karen Moukheiber, Christian Saßmannshausen, Shaheed Tayob, and Lola Wilhelm.
Author: Fleur Kemmers
In this publication Fleur Kemmers gives an overview of 21st century scholarship on Roman coinage for students and scholars in the fields of ancient history and Roman archaeology. First, it addresses the study of numismatics as a discipline and the theoretical and methodological advances of the last decades. Secondly, it provides guidelines on how to consult numismatic reference works, including those available online. Recent scholarly approaches and insights in the functions of Roman coins as both vehicles of political communication and instruments for state payments are critically assessed. Furthermore, the publication reviews the evidence for a conscious monetary policy on the part of the Roman authorities. Finally, the impact of Roman expansion and imperialism on monetisation and coin use in Rome´s Empire is discussed.
Race, Nation, and Human Rights in the Conflict (Second Edition)
Author: Eve Spangler
The Israeli/Palestinian conflict is the longest on-going hot-and-cold war in the 20th and 21st century. In this book the author argues that human rights standards are the key to a just and sustainable solution and that, tragically, no one has ever made serious use of them in trying to end the conflict. The reader will have a comprehensive view of the conflict, its relationship to surrounding world events, and its similarities to and differences from other conflicts, especially those embedded in American race relations.
Zum Reflexionszwang historischer Forschung
Technisierungsprozesse verändern derzeit die Lebenswelt in einer Weise, wie es zuvor nur der Industrialisierung attestiert wurde. Diese Herausforderungen der Gegenwart provozieren die historische Technikforschung, neue und große Fragen zu stellen.

Im Sinne einer gegenwartsorientierten Geschichtsschreibung kann Technikgeschichte nur dann zu aktuellen Debatten beitragen, wenn sie sich dem Zwang zur kritischen Reflexion stellt und neue Konzepte, Herangehensweisen und Untersuchungsfelder entwickelt. Der Band macht daher Vorschläge zur Erforschung von Digitalisierungs- und Globalisierungsprozessen sowie zur Reflexion des Menschseins in einer technisierten Welt. Weiter nimmt der Band zur Ausrufung des Anthropozäns und zur Problematik der unterschiedlichen Temporalitäten von Technik Stellung.
In (Re)using Ruins, Douglas Underwood presents a new account of the use and reuse of Roman urban public monuments in a crucial period of transition, A.D. 300-600. Commonly seen as a period of uniform decline for public building, especially in the western half of the Mediterranean, (Re)using Ruins shows a vibrant, yet variable, history for these structures.
Douglas Underwood establishes a broad catalogue of archaeological evidence (supplemented with epigraphic and literary testimony) for the construction, maintenance, abandonment and reuses of baths, aqueducts, theatres, amphitheatres and circuses in Italy, southern Gaul, Spain, and North Africa, demonstrating that the driving force behind the changes to public buildings was largely a combined shift in urban ideologies and euergetistic practices in Late Antique cities.