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From Revelation to Canon

Studies in the Hebrew Bible and Second Temple Judaism

VanderKam

Scholars who actually shape the fields they work in remain few and far between. University of Notre Dame professor James VanderKam, renowned for his writings on the Dead Sea Scrolls, is one of them. This volume represents the best of Professor VanderKam’s non-Qumran articles covering Second Temple Judaism, Hebrew Bible, apocalypticism, and key essays on 1 Enoch and Jubilees. Researchers and students will welcome having all of these readily available. Anyone working in these areas will appreciate VanderKam’s contributions to discussions concerning calendars and festivals, the high priesthood, and prophecy and apocalyptic in the ancient Near East. A new essay on the development of Scripture’s canon rounds out this essential collection.

This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Bruce D. Chilton

Edited by Jacob Neusner and Alan Avery-Peck

Jacob Neusner (vols. 1, 2, and 3) and his colleagues Alan Avery-Peck (vol. 2) and Bruce Chilton (vol. 3) have assembled a stellar team of scholars in producing what has already become an essential reference work for the study of Judaism in Late Antiquity. Originally written in nine separate volumes, Judaism in Late Antiquity now appears, unabridged, in three. The entire work seeks to offer readers both a broad perspective on the shape of Judaism while also opening the way to understanding unique issues. It does not disappoint.
VOLUME 1, including contributions by Paul Flesher, William Scott Green, Günter Stemberg, James F. Strange, looks at the literary and archeological sources to answer the question, “What are the sources for the study of Judaism in Late Antiquity.” Part two of this volume then guides the reader into how those sources help in the reconstruction of the history of “various Judaic systems in antiquity.” VOLUME 2 concentrates on the issues and debates in ancient Judaism, that is, those topics that animate scholarly dialogue today. Thus volume 2 , under the expert tutelage of Philip Davies, Lester Grabbe, and, among others, Louis Feldman, Steve Mason, James D. G. Dunn, challenges the reader with “systematic presentations of a distinctive viewpoint and very particular results” (preface, vol. 2) on such hot topics as the Law in Judaism, the use of rabbinic sources, and the place of groups within Second Temple Judaism, such as the Pharisees and Sadducees or the Samaritans. Scholars like Eric Meyers, Jodi Magness, and Joseph Naveh devote roughly 180 pages to the thorny question of the special problem of the synagogue.Using the technique of debate and response the articles bring the reader to the nub of the issues quickly and decisively. VOLUME 3 takes a look from a variety of sources and points of view at topics and themes at the center of scholarly debate, namely, resurrection and aferlife in the various writings of Judaism: Wisdom literature, Psalms, Apocalyptic Literature, Pseudepigraph, Philo and Josephus, and Qumran, among others. Again, top scholars like George Nicklesburg, John J. Collins, Roland Murphy, Richard Elliot Friedman, and Leon Rutgers bring to bear on these topics years of experience. The second half of volume 3 looks at Qumran with the same intensity. Editors Neusner, Avery-Peck, and Chilton must be commended for this generous gift both to the scholarly guild and to the general reader looking for a thought-provoking overview of the main issues in the central academic conversations.

Judaism in Late Antiquity, I, II, III is also available in hardback.

Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible

Selected Studies from Vetus Testamentum

Series:

David Orton

What is prophecy? - Social criticism? Divination? Political rhetoric? Whimsy? A literary genre? Some or all of the above, or something else entirely? How does it function in the biblical text? How did it function in Israelite society? How does it relate to phenomena found in other Ancient Near Eastern cultures? How does true prophecy differ from false? The various facets and enigmas of Hebrew prophecy have occupied many biblical scholars over recent decades, and the progress of the investigation is documented by this collection of quality articles that have appeared in Vetus Testamentum. Readers will find the individual studies, from a variety of approaches, frequently eye-opening, always instructive and stimulating. The collection as a whole offers a useful resource for all students of biblical prophecy.

J.P. Lettinga

This volume deals with the essentials of Biblical Hebrew grammatical structure. It is designed as a textbook for complete beginners, though it is detailed enough to arouse the interest of students wishing to learn a little more than the bare essentials and to see the language in the light of its earlier phases.
Unlike most grammars of its kind, this work contains a fairly extensive syntax section. The appended Volume complémentaire contains a considerable amount of exercise material and a selection of biblical texts and an inscription with annotations and cross-references to the main body of the grammar. Furthermore, there are a glossary, a set of paradigms, a subject index, and a list of technical terms with explanatory notes drawn on non-Hebrew examples.

Edited by J.P. Lettinga and Muraoka

This volume deals with the essentials of Biblical Hebrew grammatical structure. It is designed as a textbook for complete beginners, though it is detailed enough to arouse the interest of students wishing to learn a little more than the bare essentials and to see the language in the light of its earlier phases. Partly for the latter purpose there are constant references to the appropriate parts of the two advanced Biblical Hebrew grammars, Joüon-Muraoka and Waltke-O'Connor.
Unlike most grammars of its kind, this work contains a fairly extensive syntax section. The appended Hulpboek contains a considerable amount of exercise material and a selection of biblical texts and an inscription with annotations and cross-references to the main body of the grammar. Furthermore, there are a glossary, a set of paradigms, a subject index, and a list of technical terms with explanatory notes drawn on non-Hebrew examples. The volume is a considerably rewritten, revised version of the ninth edition of Lettinga's grammar.

The Old Testament in Syriac according to the Peshiṭta Version, Part II Fasc. 1a. Job

Edited on Behalf of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament by the Peshiṭta Institute, Leiden

Series:

Edited by L.G. Rignell

The Peshitta is the Syriac translation of the Old Testament made on the basis of the Hebrew text during the second century CE. Much like the Greek translations of the Old Testament, this document is an important source for our knowledge of the text of the Old Testament. Its language is also of great interest to linguists. Moreover, as Bible of the Syriac Churches it is used in sermons, commentaries, poetry, prayers, and hymns. Many terms specific to the spirituality of the Syriac Churches have their origins in this ancient and reliable version of the Old Testament.
The present edition, published by the Peshitta Institute in Leiden on behalf of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament, is the first scholarly one of this text. It presents the evidence of all known ancient manuscripts and gives full introductions to the individual books. This volume contains Job.

The Old Testament in Syriac according to the Peshiṭta Version, Part I Fasc. 2. Leviticus; Numbers; Deuteronomy; Part II, Fasc. 1b. Joshua

Edited on Behalf of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament by the Peshiṭta Institute, Leiden

Series:

The Peshitta is the Syriac translation of the Old Testament made on the basis of the Hebrew text during the second century CE. Much like the Greek translations of the Old Testament, this document is an important source for our knowledge of the text of the Old Testament. Its language is also of great interest to linguists. Moreover, as Bible of the Syriac Churches it is used in sermons, commentaries, poetry, prayers, and hymns. Many terms specific to the spirituality of the Syriac Churches have their origins in this ancient and reliable version of the Old Testament.
The present edition, published by the Peshitta Institute in Leiden on behalf of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament, is the first scholarly one of this text. It presents the evidence of all known ancient manuscripts and gives full introductions to the individual books. This volume contains Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, and Joshua.

Wandel der Rechtsbegründungen in der Gesellschaftsgeschichte des antiken Israel

Eine Rechtsgeschichte des ,Bundesbuches' Exodus XX 22 - XXIII 13

Series:

Otto

Job, ses amis et son dieu

La légende de Job et ses relectures postexiliques

Series:

Vermeylen

Yhwh's Combat with the Sea

A Canaanite Tradition in the Religion of Ancient Israel

Kloos