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Editor: Ali A. Abdi
With the limited availability of related foci in the area of critical educational studies, Critical Theorizations of Education is timely in both its topical relevance and time-space-themed discursive interventions. With its overall scope, constructed as both a counter-and-forward looking critical reflections and analysis of some of the most salient and contemporaneously active platforms of education, it prospectively and relatively comprehensively expands on dynamically intersecting learning and teaching contexts and relationships. As such, the volume’s contents by both established and emerging scholars, selectively locate the interplays of knowledge, learning and attendant power relations, which either transform or reproduce the status quo.

Contributors are: Levonne Abshire, Claire Alkouatli, David Anderson, Neda Asadi, N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba, Gulbahar Beckett, José Cossa, Ratna Ghosh, Shibao Guo, Yan Guo, Carl E. James, Dip Kapoor, Festus Kelonye Beru, Ginette Lafreniere, Qing Li, Oliver Masakure, Magnus Mfoafo-M'Carthy, Greg William Misiaszek, Dolana Mogadime, Samson Nashon, Selline Ooko, Bathseba Opini, Amy Parent, Thashika Pillay, Edward Shizha, Kimberley Tavares, Alison Taylor, and Stacey Wilson-Forsberg.
How can African philosophy of education contribute to contemporary debates in the context of complexities, dilemmas and uncertainties in African higher education? The capacity for self-reflection, self-evaluation and self-criticism enables African philosophy of higher education to examine and re-examine itself in the context of current issues in African higher education. The reflective capacity is in line with the Socratic dictum ‘know thy self.’ African Higher Education in the 21st Century: Epistemological, Ontological and Ethical Perspectives responds to the demands for reflection and self-knowledge by drawing from ontology, epistemology and ethics in an attempt to address issues that affect African higher education as they connect with the past, present and future.
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, and women. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Lamesha C. Brown, LaToya Brown, Altheria Caldera, Araceli Calderón, Marisa V. Cervantes, Joy Cobb, Raven K. Cokley, Francine R. Coston, Angela Gay, Josué R. López, Rebecca Morgan, Gloria A. Negrete-Lopez, Lisa S. Palacios, Takeshia Pierre, Alejandra I. Ramírez, Matt Reid, Ebony Russ, Jaye Sablan, Travis Smith, Phitsamay S. Uy, Jane A. Van Galen, Jason K. Wallace and Lin Wu.
First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Academic Careers
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Careers overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school and then become faculty, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, women, or people with disabilities. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to a research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Veronica R. Barrios, Candis Bond, Beth Buyserie, Noralis Rodríguez Coss, Charise Paulette DeBerry, Janette Diaz, Alfred P. Flores, José García, Cynthia George, Shonda Goward, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Nataria T. Joseph, Castagna Lacet, Jennifer M. Longley, Catherine Ma, Esther Díaz Martín, Nadia Yolanda Alverez Mexia, T. Mark Montoya, Miranda Mosier, Michelle Parrinello-Cason, J. Michael Ryan, Adrián Arroyo Pérez, Will Porter, Jaye Sablan, Theresa Stewart-Ambo, Keisha Thompson, Ethan Trinh, Jane A. Van Galen and Wendy Champagnie Williams.
Overarching principles of human rights which shore up a nearly 30-year history of international efforts to develop educational systems that are responsive to the needs of all. Arguably the most widely recognised international inclusive education policy, the Salamanca Statement released in 1994 from the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), recognised that every child has a basic right to education.

In so doing, however, it drew a line around special needs as a particular emphasis, in globalising efforts towards equal opportunity through decrees for first principles of universally attainable privileges. Considered a watershed moment in global responses to educational exclusion, the Salamanca Statement was core to increasing awareness among nations of the need for fostering more inclusive education policy and practice. Nonetheless, the liberal ideologies that frame human rights in inclusive education are seldom called into question, despite perpetual marginalisation and disadvantage post Salamanca.

Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right? brings the many together to consider educational democracy at a moment in global history where the political order fractures populations, and the displacement of socio-economic participation is displayed in every news bulletin – true, fake or otherwise. Under these conditions, the significance of academic activism, wherein diverse perspectives, methodologies and theoretical approaches are put to work to increase equity in education, has perhaps never been so stark. Across the collection the combined chapters engage with researchers, students, education professionals and leaders, advocacy organisations, and people experiencing exclusion and consider human rights in relation to inclusive education.

Contributors are: Kate Anderson, Alison Baker, Tim Corcoran, Edwin Creely, Jenny Duke, Peng-Sim Eng, Leechin Heng, Anna Kilderry, Sarah Lambert, Bec Marland, Julianne Moss, Philippa Moylan, Mia Nosrat, Joanne O’Mara, Jo Raphael, Bethany Rice, Andrew Riordan, Amathullah Shakeeb, Roger Slee, Kitty te Riele, Matthew K. E. Thomas, Peter Walker, Scott Welsh, Ben Whitburn, Julie White and Michalinos Zembylas.
Author: Roger Slee

Abstract

This ‘afterword’ for this collection of chapters on exclusion and inclusion asks the question, After Words? Reflecting on life in the early stages of COVID-19 lockdown in the north of England, it is clear that the abiding patterns of exclusion are amplified by the pandemic and the responses to it. The educational panacea – “Just go online” – may well be adequately managed by those who enjoy a workspace in comfortable surroundings with the requisite technological apparatus to access the new forms of delivering education (as delivery it is). This does not apply to all. So, exclusion endures and requires our vigilance and resistance. The second purpose of this chapter is to remind us of the comfort we academics enjoy as the agents of critique. How do we find meaningful engagements, beyond our words, in the more demanding and urgent project of reconstruction?

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?

Abstract

Discrimination, bias, inequality, and inequity, are terms that are all too commonly associated with education for those obscured in the margins and excluded from the main. Herein, we attempt to chorus the voices that have remained in the shadowy discourses of inclusive education. Further, we fuse diverse sociological perspectives and examine points of friction, murmuration, and interplay. Through this, we endeavor to move beyond empty rhetoric and what has become the canonical assumptions of inclusive education. Instead, we turn to considerations of multiplicity; in doing so we take up arms at the intersections of the impact of neoliberalism and artificial intelligence, poverty and regional education, and finally the utilization of camouflage to hide the social realities of segregation. Through these narrative junctures, we find solace in the capacity to call out exclusion, irregularity, and oppression and complicate the underside of inclusion which scratches at common-sensical notions that inclusive education is a Right, right?

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?

Abstract

The Encountering Diversity Project places people with disabilities at the center of professional practice knowledge and the teaching and learning process. The centerpiece of this project is the Teaching for Diversity Workshop (Diversity Workshop). This university-based workshop, co-facilitated by actors with disabilities from Fusion, http://www.fusiontheatre.com.au, a Victorian Theatre company, enables pre-service teachers to experience a range of drama and applied theatre arts-based activities focused on educational inclusion. In this chapter, we position the Encountering Diversity project theoretically in the discipline of disability studies in education and consider how the lived experience of disability enables the actors to work effectively in the Diversity Workshop. The theoretical resources of philosopher Emmanuel Levinas are deployed to frame the Diversity Workshop as an ethical encounter of the face-to-face, highlighting both the pedagogical and ontological dimensions of this iteration of the research program. Through the willing participation of the actors with disabilities as teachers and co-researchers, the project embraces the right for people with disabilities to have a voice not only in teacher education but in the broader program of research for inclusion.

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?
Author: Leechin Heng

Abstract

This chapter presents findings from a doctoral study that focuses on an attempt by a set of teaching practitioners to re\conceptualize what inclusive education might mean via the development and facilitation of a new initial teacher education (ITE) program in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). The purpose is to situate inclusion at the center of the program that recognizes classroom students’ rights to an education that is inclusive and equitable to their sociocultural contexts and prior knowledge. Through the lens of critical discourse analysis (CDA), the study investigates the social space enabled by government funding in a new postgraduate ITE program – a site regulated by dominant interests and agendas. This chapter will draw on data obtained through an 11-month qualitative case study process undertaken for the research.

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?

Abstract

The Australian National Consistent Collection of Data (NCCD) has forced all schools to make sense of the huge number of policies, including international Human Rights Agreements, that is impacting on their daily practice. The requirement to identify, record and collect evidence about adjustments for students with a disability has highlighted the need for teachers to understand their role as an actor in the policy cycle for several national and state policies including Disability Discrimination Act: Disability Standards (2005). In a way, this making sense of policy and applying it to practice can be likened to ‘herding cats’. ‘Herding cats’ is an idiom denoting a futile attempt to control or organize a class of inherently uncontrollable entities. In this chapter, the authors present two explanatory case studies about schools that have implemented a framework of action research to assist schools’ understanding of their obligations to policy. The major finding is that the action research framework has assisted teachers to make sense of the impact of compliance policies on their practice and at the same time improved teaching and learning in two secondary schools.

In: Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right?