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Voluntary associations (VAs) are the oldest and most frequent type of groups in the charitable, voluntary, nonprofit, third, or civil society sector worldwide. Smith’s book reviews the positive long-term historical impacts of some fundamentally deviant VAs (DVAs) or dark side examples of such associations. Dissenting DVAs such as the American Anti-Slavery Society in the 1800s and the National Woman’s Party in the early 1900s worked long and effectively to foster U.S. socio-cultural progress and ethical evolution as part of the global rights revolution. Parallel Noxious DVAs like the German Nazi Party or Heaven’s Gate mass suicide cult had opposite, deeply harmful impacts. Eccentric DVAs like nudist/naturist clubs or Oneida free-love commune (mid-1800s) were largely harmless hobbies, with little harmful impact.
Race, Nation, and Human Rights in the Conflict (Second Edition)
Author: Eve Spangler
The Israeli/Palestinian conflict is the longest on-going hot-and-cold war in the 20th and 21st century. In this book the author argues that human rights standards are the key to a just and sustainable solution and that, tragically, no one has ever made serious use of them in trying to end the conflict. The reader will have a comprehensive view of the conflict, its relationship to surrounding world events, and its similarities to and differences from other conflicts, especially those embedded in American race relations.
Central and Eastern European Issues in Global Perspective
Populism, Memory and Minority Rights is the flagship publication of the Tom Lantos Institute (TLI), a highly-regarded international human rights institute based in Budapest, Hungary. The publication provides a forum for discussion on crucial themes of global and regional importance on the accommodation of ethno-cultural diversity and related normative developments. It introduces TLI’s work in terms of its mandated issue areas, including Roma rights and citizenship, Jewish life and antisemitism, and Hungarian and other national minorities. The theoretical and empirical studies, commentaries, interviews, reports and other documents offer a unique source of information for libraries, research institutes, civil society actors, governments, intergovernmental organizations and all those interested in contemporary normative trends and debates in international minority protection.
Author: William Brant
In this book, William Brant uncovers social causes of violence, in search of reductive measures. Multiple legal systems are explored as reducers and implementers of violence and threats, especially criminal justice systems. War, propagandizing, power, corporate and governmental involvement in social domination, statehood, dangerous ideologies, and tribal sexual domination are explored in many cultures. Various levels and methods are given for observing, measuring and analyzing how people think and behave regarding the law, including examples of comedy. A theoretical chapter presents legal theory in relation to conceptions of possibility and misconceptions. These ideas are applied to judiciaries, which expose winning strategies for lawyers’ desired verdicts. Dr. Brant accounts for the interconnections between sexual selection, legal systems and wars.
Many judgments regarding what is good or bad, possible or impossible, rely upon unspoken assumptions or frameworks which are used to view and evaluate events and actions. Philosophers uncover these hidden aspects of thoughts and judgments, scrutinizing them for soundness, validity, and fairness. These assumptions and frameworks permeate the topics of violence, nonviolence, war, conflict, and reconciliation; and these assumptions influence how we address these problems and issues. The papers in this volume explore what kind of assumptions and frameworks would be needed in order for people to see nonviolence as a sensible approach to contemporary problems. Topics include conceptions of positive peace, nonviolence and international structures, and perspectives on peace education. Contributors are Elizabeth N. Agnew, Andrew Fitz-Gibbon, William C. Gay, Ronald J. Glossop, Ian M. Harris, John Kultgen, Joseph C. Kunkel, Douglas Lewis, Danielle Poe and Harry van der Linden.