Browse results

Author: Grzegorz Moroz
A Generic History of Travel Writing in Anglophone and Polish Literature offers a comprehensive, comparative and generic analysis of developments of travel writing in Anglophone and Polish literature from the Late Medieval Period to the twenty-first century. These developments are depicted in a wider context of travel narratives written in other European languages. Grzegorz Moroz convincingly argues that, for all the similarities and cross-cultural influences, in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth century non-fiction Anglophone and Polish travel writing have dynamically evolved different generic horizons of expectations. While the Anglophone travel book developed relatively steadily in that period, the Polish genre of the podróż was first replaced by the listy (kartki) z podróży, and then by the reportaż podróżniczy.
The series Architecture – Technology – Culture provides a publishing environment for cutting-edge research in the three areas where modern technology effected major and lasting changes: architecture and space, visual culture and the media, literature and the arts in general. While our prime focus is on the theory, history, and politics of technology, both architecture and, the broader, accompanying field of culture are in many ways directly related to and influenced by technological changes. Thus one can look at architecture as a technology of spatial organization, a technical system of signs or, in Nobert Wiener's terms, a "technique" of the time that reflects the aesthetic and intellectual order of a given society. Literature and the arts, on the other hand, are crucial in negotiating the tensions that arise from the introduction of new technologies, of new means of production and communication. By making technological progress palatable for a larger public or by questioning its safety and its potential negative consequences for the future, the arts are inextricably involved in the changing of physical space and the environment in modern society and their styles and structures are often formed as a response to larger networks such as urban space, transportation or the changes in visual and material culture.
Attributing Excellence in Medicine discusses the aura around the prestigious Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. It analyzes the social processes and contingent factors leading to recognition and reputation in science and medicine. This volume will help the reader to better understand the dynamics of the attribution of excellence throughout the 20th century.

Contributors are Massimiano Bucchi, Fabio De Sio, Jacalyn Duffin, Heiner Fangerau, Thorsten Halling, Nils Hansson, David S. Jones, Gustav Källstrand, Ulrich Koppitz, Pauline Mattsson, Katarina Nordqvist, Scott H. Podolsky, Thomas Schlich, and Sven Widmalm.
In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine
In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine
In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine
In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine
In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine
In: Attributing Excellence in Medicine