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Ḥāfiẓ Abrū

Edited by Ṣādiq Sajjādī

Ḥāfiẓ Abrū (d. 833/1430) was a Timurid historian who spent the greater part of his active life in Herat. An accomplished chess-player, he was a regular guest at the court of the chess-loving Tīmūr Lang (d. 807/1405). His works were all commissioned by Tīmūr’s son Shāhrūkh (d. 850/1447), whom he had joined at his court in Herat after his accession to the throne in 807/1405. The Jaghrāfiyā is of special interest because in the parts on Fārs, Kirmān,Transoxania and Khurāsān, geographical data—often collected personally by him during military campaigns in which he took part—are supplemented with much valuable historical information. The three volumes published here contain the first of the two books of which the Jaghrāfiyā is composed, treating of Kirmān (vol. 3), Fārs (vol. 2), and the known world to the west of these (including Arabia), with separate listings of mountains, rivers, lakes and seas (vol.1 , beginning vol. 2). 3 vols; volume 1.

Khulāṣat al-ashʿār wa-zubdat al-afkār. Volume 6.5, 6.6

Bakhsh-i Qazwīn, Gīlān wa Dār al-marz wa nawāḥi-yi ān

Series:

Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī

Edited by Sayyid Muḥammad Dabīrsīyāqī and Mahdī Malik Muḥammadī

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The work by Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī (alive in 1016/1607) published here is an important example of this. It consists of an introduction, four divisions, and an epilogue ( khātima), six volumes in all. From among these volumes, the epilogue listing some 394 poets from specific cities and regions in the Persianate world, many of whom were contemporaries of the author, is of special interest. Having met with many of them on his literary travels, their biographies contain a lot of information on the social and cultural climate of the time, besides new poets and poems. This volume: 6.5-6, Qazvin, Gilan, and Mazandaran.

Khulāṣat al-ashʿār wa-zubdat al-afkār. Volume 6.8

Bakhsh-i Yazd wa Kirmān wa nawāḥi-yi ān

Series:

Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī

Edited by Sayyid ʿAlī Mīrāfḍalī

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The work by Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī (alive in 1016/1607) published here is an important example of this. It consists of an introduction, four divisions, and an epilogue ( khātima), six volumes in all. From among these volumes, the epilogue listing some 394 poets from specific cities and regions in the Persianate world, many of whom were contemporaries of the author, is of special interest. Having met with many of them on his literary travels, their biographies contain a lot of information on the social and cultural climate of the time, besides new poets and poems. This volume: 6.8, Yazd, Kirman, and India.

Series:

Muḥammad al-Ḥaqāʾiqī

Edited by ʿAlī Ṣafarī Āq Qalʿa

In Islamic science, a zīj is an astronomical handbook made up of tables and text. Between the 2nd/8th and 13th/19th centuries, over 200 such works were written, many of them lost. Famous zīj are al-Zīj al-Ṣābiʾ by al-Battānī (ca 300/900), al-Qānūn al-Masʿūdī by al-Bīrūnī (421/1030), and Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī’s (d. 672/1274) Zīj-i Īlkhānī. The Zīj-i Yamīnī published in facsimile here was compiled in Ghazna in 511/1156 by a certain Muḥammad al-Ḥaqāʾiqī and dedicated to the Ghaznavid ruler Bahrāmshāh b. Masʿūd b. Maḥmūd (reg. 511-552/1117-1157). It is the third oldest zīj in Persian, after the Zīj-i mufrad of Muḥammad b. Ayyūb Ṭabarī (485/1092) and the Persian translation of Kūshyār b. Labbān Gīlānī’s (fl. ca. 390/1000) Arabic al-Zīj al-jāmiʿ by Muḥammad b. ʿUmar Munajjim-i Tabrīzī in 483/1090. Al-Ḥaqāʾiqī based himself on the works of others, notably al-Battānī’s al-Zīj al-Ṣābiʿ, whose data he then recalculated for the city of Ghazna where necessary. Good example of early scientific Persian.

Khulāṣat al-ashʿār wa-zubdat al-afkār. Volume 6.7

Bakhsh-i Tabrīz wa Ādharbāyjān wa nawāḥi-yi ān

Series:

Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī

Edited by Ruqīya Bāyrām Ḥaqīqī

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The work by Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī (alive in 1016/1607) published here is an important example of this. It consists of an introduction, four divisions, and an epilogue ( khātima), six volumes in all. From among these volumes, the epilogue listing some 394 poets from specific cities and regions in the Persianate world, many of whom were contemporaries of the author, is of special interest. Having met with many of them on his literary travels, their biographies contain a lot of information on the social and cultural climate of the time, besides new poets and poems. This volume: 6.7, Tabriz and Azerbaijan.

Dīwān-i Ḥāfiẓ-i Shīrāzī

Kuhantarīn nuskha-yi shinākhta shuda-yi kāmil kitābat 801 hijrī

Series:

Ḥāfiẓ Shīrāzī

Edited by Bihrūz Īmānī

Ḥāfiẓ Shīrāzī (d. 791/1389) is the most popular poet of the Persianate world and the greatest lyricist of all. There is virtually no family in Iran that does not possess a copy of his divan. Many people quote from his work by heart. His poetry is often used in proverbs, and fortune-telling with his divan is common practice in all layers of society, earning him his nickname of ‘Lisān al-ghayb’, i.e. ‘the voice of the unknown’. Ḥāfiẓ’s poems combine practical wisdom with meditations on destiny while emphasizing the importance of living in the moment, today called ‘mindfulness’. Despite claims to the contrary, his poetry is not mystical but definitely about the here-and-now. His favourite themes are love, wine and its effects, and the witty exposure of pretenders. This facsimile of the second oldest and completest copy of his divan from 801/1399 is the only one to posses the complete introduction by its compiler, Muḥammad Gulandām.

Kāmil al-taʿbīr. Volume 2

Atharī jāmiʿ bih zabān-i Fārsī dar khābguzārī va taʿbīr-i rūyā, jild-i duvum ṣād - yāʾ

Series:

Ḥubaysh b. Ibrāhīm Tiflīsī

Edited by Mukhtār Kumaylī

Since times immemorial man has been fascinated by his dreams. This is true of western civilization as it is true of any other civilization, including Islam. In the Qurʾān and the traditions, dreams and visions are frequently mentioned as instruments of divine guidance and instruction. This sanctification of the pre-existing oral tradition around dreams and their interpretation created room for this tradition to further develop, both in a religious and in a secular context. Dream interpretation remained unsystematized and mostly oral until Ḥunayn b. Isḥāq’s (d. 260/873) Arabic translation of Artemidorus’ (2nd cent. CE) Oneirocritica and Dīnawarī’s al-Qādirī fi ʼl-taʿbīr (commissioned in 397/1006) that it inspired. From then onwards, a vast literature developed. The work published here is an important early text from the Persianate world, based on more than fifteen declared and other sources, most of which are lost. It is a compilatory work, with an introduction followed by an alphabetical inventory of themes. 2 vols; volume 2.

Series:

Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī

Edited by ʿAbd al-ʿAlī Khān Burūmānd and Muḥammad Ḥusayn Naṣīrī Kahnamūyī

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The work by Mīr Taqī al-Dīn Kāshānī (alive in 1016/1607) published here is an important example of this. It consists of an introduction, four divisions, and an epilogue ( khātima), six volumes in all. From among these volumes, the epilogue listing some 394 poets from specific cities and regions in the Persianate world, many of whom were contemporaries of the author, is of special interest. Having met with many of them on his literary travels, their biographies contain a lot of information on the social and cultural climate of the time, besides new poets and poems. This volume: 6.12, Khorasan.

Az nuskhahā-yi Istānbūl

Dastnivīshā-ī dar falsafah, kalām, ʿirfān

Series:

Anonymous

Edited by Sayyid Muḥammad ʿImādī Ḥāiʿrī

For those working with Islamic manuscripts the libraries of Istanbul have always been a treasure-trove. New discoveries are frequently reported and of many texts, the oldest or only copy is kept in some library in Istanbul. Since the publication of the defters of the Istanbul libraries in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, many more catalogues and handlists have been produced in an effort to render the immense amount of material more accessible. Even if the bulk of this work is done by Turkish specialists, foreign scholars, too, do their part. The present collection of research notes is a case in point. They describe a number of important Arabic and Persian manuscripts in philosophy, theology and mysticism selected for publication by the Written Heritage Research Centre in Tehran. Some of these manuscripts are in the hand of, or contain marginalia by, Naṣīr al-Dīn Ṭūsī (d. 672/1274), Najm al-Dīn Kātibī (d. 675/1276), and others.

Series:

ʿĀrif Nūshāhī

Punjab University Library in Lahore, Pakistan, formerly College Library Punjab University in 1873, acquired its present name when the college gained university status in 1882. Punjab University has some 50 affiliated libraries in various departments, colleges and institutes, with Punjab University Library as its major, ‘central’ library. This library possesses the largest collection of manuscripts in Pakistan and in 2007 their number had reached 14.482 titles in Persian, Arabic and Urdu. Besides a general section comprising manuscripts purchased from or donated by ordinary citizens, the manuscript department contains seven subcollections, acquired from prominent collectors: Āzād, Pīrzāda, Kayfī, Woolner, Shīrānī, Maḥbūb ʿAlam, and Āzar. The present two-volume catalogue, prepared by the well-known Pakistani specialist of Islamic manuscripts, ʿĀrif Nawshāhī, and his collaborators, describes manuscripts in the general section and in four of the seven subcollections. Only manuscripts that were thusfar not or insufficiently catalogued are recorded, with work on the Shīrānī collection still being incomplete.