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Volume Editor: John Makeham
This innovative volume demonstrates how and to what ends the writings of Xiong Shili, Ma Yifu, Tang Junyi and Mou Zongsan adopted and repurposed conceptual models derived from the Buddhist text Treatise on Awakening Mahāyāna Faith. It shows which of the philosophical positions defended by these New Confucian philosophers were developed and sustained through engagement with the critical challenges advanced by scholars who attacked the Treatise. It also examines the extent to which twentieth-century New Confucians were aware of their intellectual debt to the Treatise and explains how they reconciled this awareness with their Confucian identity.
An Exploration of Feeling, Value and Virtue
Author: Yinghua Lu
Critically developing the Contemporary New Confucianism, this book opens a new horizon for the study of emotions and philosophy of heart-mind and [human] nature by focusing on the communication between phenomenology, particularly Schelerian phenomenology, and Chinese philosophy, especially Mencius and Wang Yangming. Such communication demonstrates how ethics based on factual experience is possible, revealing the original spirit and fresh meaning of Confucian learning of the heart-mind. In clarifying crucial feelings and values, this work undertakes a detailed description of the heart’s concrete activities for the idea that “the heart has its own order,” allowing us to see the order of the heart and its deviated form clearly and comprehensively.
Improving Reading Fluency
This Reader aims to help students start reading original Sanskrit literature.
When we study ancient languages, there often is quite a gap between introductory, grammar-based classes and independent reading of original texts. This Reader bridges that gap by offering complete grammar and vocabulary notes for 40 entertaining, thought-provoking or simply beautiful passages from Sanskrit narrative and epic, as well as over 130 subhāṣitas (epigrams).
These readings are complemented by review sections on syntax, word formation and compounding, a 900-word study vocabulary, complete transliterations and literal translations of all readings, as well as supplementary online resources.
The Reader can be used for self-study and in a classroom, both to accompany introductory Sanskrit courses and to succeed them.
Editor / Translator: Daniel Canaris
The True Record of the Lord of Heaven ( Tianzhu shilu, 1584) by the Jesuit missionary Michele Ruggieri was the first Chinese-language work ever published by a European. Despite being published only a few years after Ruggieri started learning Chinese, it evinced sophisticated strategies to accommodate Christianity to the Chinese context and was a pioneering work in Sino-Western exchange. This book features a critical edition of the Chinese and Latin texts, which are both translated into English for the first time. An introduction, biography, and rich annotations are provided to situate this text in its cultural and intellectual context.
Author: Zhaoyuan WAN
WAN Zhaoyuan analyses how Chinese intellectuals conceived of the relationship between ‘science’ and ‘religion’ through in-depth examination of the writings of Kang Youwei, a prominent political reformer and radical Confucian thinker, often referred to by his disciples as the ‘Martin Luther of Confucianism’.
Confronted with the rise of scientism and challenged by the Conflict Thesis during his life among adversarial Chinese New Culture intellectuals, Kang maintains a holistic yet evolving conception of a compatible and complementary relationship between scientific knowledge and ‘true religion’ exemplified by his Confucian religion ( kongjiao). This close analysis of Kang’s ideas contributes to a richer understanding of the history of science and religion in China and in a more global context.
Edited by Marine Carrin (Editor-in-Chief) and Michel Boivin, Marine Carrin, Paul Hockings, Raphaël Rousseleau, Tanka Subha, Harald Tambs-Lyche, Gérard Toffin (Associate editors)
Brill’s Encyclopedia of the Religions of the Indigenous People of South Asia Online strives to reflect the diversity of indigenous cultures of South Asia with its many language groups and religious traditions. Religion is taken in a broad sense and includes aspects of morality, symbolism, identity formation, environmental concerns, and art. The approach is contemporary and not a reconstruction of an anterior state, though this does not exclude talking about historical processes.
Brill Companions Online is a suite of e-book collections comprising state-of-the art research companions in various subject fields within the humanities. Peer reviewed and written by experts, these handbooks offer balanced accounts at an advanced level, along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. Designed for students and scholars, the books explain what sources there are, what methodologies and approaches are appropriate in dealing with them, what issues arise and how they have been treated, and what room there is for disagreement. All volumes are in English.

Brill Companions Online can be purchased as a whole, but is also available in six different subject categories.

Features & Benefits
• Over 20 years of content.
• Online access to 345 reference works.
• Over 6,000 essays purpose-written by leading experts.
• Sophisticated tools allow for exporting citations, save searches and sharing content.
• Easy navigation through full-text search and metadata search.
• Students and faculty will have the option to order their own $25 paperback copy of each title in the collection through Brill’s MyBook program.

Please note that titles published since 2007, with the exception of those included in Brill’s Companions to Classical Studies Online, are also available in other E-Book collections.
Religious Diffusion and Cross-fertilization beyond the Reach of the Central Tibetan Government
The volume brings together nine contributions presenting cutting-edge research on ris med. The relatively high degree of political autonomy in the A mdo and Khams regions paved the way for the Rnying ma, Sa skya, Bka’ brgyud, Jo nang, and Bon traditions to closely collaborate with each other in a spirit of mutual respect and non-partiality ( ris med), while enjoying protection and support from local rulers. The contributors examine degrees of tolerance ranging from hierarchical inclusivism to genuine pluralism, inter-tradition relations and collaborations, religio-political entanglements, and the positions, writings and actions of the key figures of ris med. Thus, they bring to light that ris med cannot be reduced to its historical, political, religious or sociological facet, but is always a conglomerate of all of them.

Groundbreaking research by leading international Tibetan studies scholars Filippo Brambilla, Gabriele Coura, Douglas Duckworth, Adam C. Krug, Klaus-Dieter Mathes, Giacomella Orofino, Rachel H. Pang, Adam S. Pearcey, and Frédéric Richard.
Author: Céline Redard
This book is a multi-faceted study of the Srōš Drōn, comprising chapters 3 to 8 of the Yasna ceremony, the core ritual of the Zoroastrian religion. It provides a critical edition produced with the electronic tools of the project The Multimedia Yasna, and a study of the performative aspects of the Srōš Drōn both through the lens of the ritual directions and in comparison with the Drōn Yašt ceremony.
By analysing the Srōš Drōn both as a text attested in manuscripts and as a ritual performance, Céline Redard applies a new approach to unlock the meaning of these chapters of the Yasna.

Abstract

'Jam dbyangs Mkhyen rtse Chos kyi dbang phyug (1909–1960) was born in Kham, during one the most critical periods of Tibetan history. His life story reflects the controversial and dramatic times that troubled Tibetan history before the Chinese annexation. When he was three years old, he was recognized as a reincarnation of 'Jam dbyangs Mkhyen rtse'i dbang po (1820–1892) and received an intense Buddhist education from many important masters of the time. He mainly conduced his life secluded in retreats and rediscovered several gter ma, under the name of He ka gling pa. He never wanted to get involved in the internecine feuds and rivalries for the control of the monasteries that their administrators undertook. He died in prison in 1960, soon after the major part of the monasteries in the Khams province had been razed to the ground.

The thread of this story is unravelled against the background of the political situation of the Khams region in the first half of the nineteenth century, where other different lives intertwine with the figure of mKhyen rtse Chos kyi dbang phyug, casting light on the wider social, ideological and political context of the historical time.

In: Nonsectarianism (ris med) in 19th- and 20th-Century Eastern Tibet