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The Buddhist Thought and Practice of Sheng’an Shixian (1686–1734) and Other Patriarchs
This vigorously-researched publication for advanced graduate students and fellow scholars of the Chinese Pure Land tradition (Jingtu famen) in the wider context of Chinese Buddhism extends the horizon opened up by recent leading scholars to reconstruct a more insightful understanding of the Jingtu famen and the notion of zong. Focusing on previously unstudied writings of Shixian and other patriarchs, the findings support the argument that the Jingtu famen is an advanced form of Mahāyānist meditation rooted in the Mādhyamika and Yogācāra traditions. The original English translation of Master Shixian’s writings provided also paves the way for other researchers to conduct new and extended studies.
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In The Divine/Demonic Seven and the Place of Demons in Mesopotamia, Gina Konstantopoulos analyses the Sebettu, a group of seven divine/demonic figures found across a wide range of Mesopotamian textual and artistic sources in Mesopotamia from the late third to first millennium BCE.

The Sebettu appeared both as fierce, threatening demons and as divine, protective, figures. These seemingly contradictory qualities worked together, as their martial ferocity facilitated their religious and political role. When used in royal inscriptions, they became fierce warriors attacking the king’s enemies, retaining that demonic nature. This flexibility was not unique to the Sebettu, and this study thus provides a lens through which to examine the place of demons in Mesopotamia as a whole.
Zen and the Tantric Teachings in Premodern Japan
When a Zen teacher tells you to point at your mind, which part of your body do you point at?
According to the Japanese master Chikotsu Daie (1229–1312), you should point at the fistful of meat that is your heart. Esoteric Zen demonstrates that far from an outlier, Daie's understanding reflects the medieval Buddhist mainstream, in which tantric teachings and Zen were closely entwined movements that often developed within the same circles of thinkers and texts. ,br/> Drawing on newly discovered manuscript materials, it shows how medieval practitioners constructed a unique form of Zen by drawing on tantric doctrinal discourses.
Volume Editors: and
In their theological and historical interactions, neo-Calvinism and Roman Catholicism have often met in moments of conflict and co-operation. The neo-Calvinist statesman Abraham Kuyper polemicized against the Roman Catholic Church and its theology, whilst building bridges between those traditions by forging novel political coalitions across ecclesiastical boundaries. In theology, Gerrit C. Berkouwer, a neo-Calvinist critic of Roman Catholicism in the 1930s, later attended the Second Vatican Council as an appreciative Protestant observer. Telling their stories and others—including new research on lesser-known figures and neglected topics—this book presents the first scholarly volume on those dynamics of polemics and partnership.
Vulnerability is at the core of the political drama of our time. Countering conventional approaches, this book presents human vulnerability as a source of political community and a potential for political agency in precarity. Analyzing Christian celebrations of Christmas and Easter in contexts of struggle, it shows how religious resources inspire precarious politics. Combining critical political theory, liberation theology, and lived religion, Sturla J. Stålsett sees in such celebrations a ‘political sacralization’ of vulnerability and a ‘dispossession of divinity.’
This volume is a collection of essays written in honor of David Burr, emeritus professor at the Polytechnic University of Virginia (Blacksburg): a scholar who has spent a career researching and publishing on the multi-faceted phenomenon of the Spiritual Franciscans (late 13th-early 14th century) and, in particular, on the life and writings of Peter of John Olivi in southern France.
Representing some of the finest scholars in the field these eighteen scholarly essays touch on aspects of both phenomena. Three essays are devoted to the historiography of David Burr; three are dedicated to medieval Apocalypticism; another seven deal specifically with Peter of John Olivi; and five final essays explore aspects of the Spiritual Franciscans, their precursors and adherents.
Contributors are C. Colt Anderson, Marco Bartoli, Michael F. Cusato, Gilbert Dahan, Alberto Forni, Fortunato Iozzelli, Philip D. Krey, Robert E. Lerner, Warren Lewis, Michele Lodone, Kevin Madigan, Antonio Montefusco, Delfi I. Nieto-Isabel, Dabney G. Park, Sylvain Piron, Gian Luca Potestà, Marco Rainini, and Paolo Vian.
Seventeenth-Century Libraries: Problems and Perspectives presents key topics for understanding the theory and practice of library formation in the seventeenth century, both in Britain and on the Continent. In eight studies (plus a substantial introduction and afterword) based on meticulous research, the volume addresses questions of acquisition, classification, administration and access, spatial arrangement and furniture, networks of collecting, and dispersal of libraries, and serves as an introduction to methods of investigating these themes. Seventeenth-Century Libraries: Problems and Perspectives is a landmark volume that confronts outstanding issues of cultural and intellectual history by synthesizing recent research on the growth of libraries during a period that was crucial for the development of modern knowledge management, historical attitudes, and material culture.

Contribuors include: Robyn Adams, Richard Foster, Francesca Galligan, Jaap Geraerts, Jacqueline Glomski, Shanti Graheli, Clodagh Murphy, David Pearson, Dominique Varry, and Elizabeth Wells.
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Modern Orthodox identity is deeply interwoven with the notion of deification or union with God. For some theologians, deification represents the lens through which most, if not all, theological questions should be engaged. In this volume, Petre Maican undertakes the task of critically examining the extent to which deification informs the main debates inside Orthodox theology, focusing on four essential loci: anthropology, the Trinity, epistemology, and ecclesiology. Maican argues that while deification remains central to anthropology and the Orthodox understanding of the Trinity, it seems less relevant in the areas of ecclesiology and complexifies the Orthodox approach to Scripture and Tradition.
« Origins », Transmission, and Metamorphoses of Adab literature
The notion of adab is at the very heart of the Islamicate cultures. Born in the crucible of the Arabic and Persian civilisations of the Late Antiquity period, nourished by Greek, Syriac and Indian influences, this polysemic notion could cover a variegated range of meanings, ranging from good behaviour, good manners, etiquette, proper knowledge of the rules, to belles-lettres, and finally, literature. This volume addresses the notion of adab through four perspectives, which correspond to the four parts into which it is divided: “Origins”; “Transmissions”; “Metamorphosis” of the “Origins” and finally “Origins” through the lens of modernity.