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"An Unusual Inquisition"

Translated Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck

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Christopher S. Mackay

Heinricus Institoris is the major author of the Malleus Maleficarum, the best known early-modern textbook on witchcraft. This work was heavily influenced by Institoris's activities as inquisitor in Ravensburg in 1484 and Innsbruck in 1485. This volume contains the only complete translations of a large number of documents pertaining to these inquisitions, and is a companion to a new (and the only complete) edition of these texts, which shed much light on the composition of the Malleus Maleficarum in general.

Visualising Ethnicity in the Southwest Borderlands

Gender and Representation in Late Imperial and Republican China

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Jing Zhu

This book explores the mutual constitutions of visuality and empire from the perspective of gender, probing how the lives of China’s ethnic minorities at the southwest frontiers were translated into images. Two sets of visual materials make up its core sources: the Miao album, a genre of ethnographic illustration depicting the daily lives of non-Han peoples in late imperial China, and the ethnographic photographs found in popular Republican-era periodicals. It highlights gender ideals within images and develops a set of “visual grammar” of depicting the non-Han. Casting new light on a spectrum of gendered themes, including femininity, masculinity, sexuality, love, body and clothing, the book examines how the power constructed through gender helped to define, order, popularise, celebrate and imagine possessions of empire.

Visualizing Coregency

An Exploration of the Link between Royal Image and Co-Rule during the Reign of Senwosret III and Amenemhet III

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Lisa Saladino Haney

In Visualizing Coregency, Lisa Saladino Haney explores the practice of co-rule during Egypt’s 12th Dynasty and the role of royal statuary in expressing the dynamics of shared power. Though many have discussed coregencies, few have examined how such a concept was expressed visually. Haney presents both a comprehensive accounting of the evidence for coregency during the 12th Dynasty and a detailed analysis of the full corpus of royal statuary attributed to Senwosret III and Amenemhet III. This study demonstrates that by the reign of Senwosret III the central government had developed a wide-ranging visual, textual, and religious program that included a number of distinctive portrait types designed to convey the central political and cultural messages of the dynasty.

The Book of the Twelve

Composition, Reception, and Interpretation

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Edited by Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer and Jakob Wöhrle

In the last two decades, research on the Book of the Twelve has shown that this corpus is not just a collection of twelve prophetic books. It is rather a coherent work with a common history of formation and, based upon this, with an overall message and intention. The individual books of the Book of the Twelve are thus part of a larger whole in which they can be interpreted in a fruitful manner. The volume The Book of the Twelve: Composition, Reception, and Interpretation features 30 articles, written by renowned scholars, that explore different aspects regarding the formation, interpretation, and reception of the Book of the Twelve as a literary unity.

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Henk De Waard

In Jeremiah 52 in the Context of the Book of Jeremiah, Henk de Waard offers a thorough examination of the final chapter of the book of Jeremiah. Particular attention is paid to the chapter’s relationship with the parallel text in 2 Kings 24:18–25:30, to the differences between the Masoretic text and the Old Greek translation, to the literary function of Jeremiah 52 within the book of Jeremiah, and to the chapter’s historical context.
De Waard shows that, especially in the early text form represented by the Old Greek, Jeremiah 52 is not a mere appendix to the book, but a golah-oriented epilogue, indicating the contrasting destinies of pre-exilic Judah and the exilic community in Babylon.

Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham

Introduction, Translation, and Commentary

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Ellen Birnbaum and John M. Dillon

On the Life of Abraham displays Philo’s philosophical, exegetical, and literary genius at its best. Philo begins by introducing the biblical figures Enos, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as unwritten laws. Then, interweaving literal, ethical, and allegorical interpretations, Philo presents the life and achievements of Abraham, founder of the Jewish nation, in the form of a Greco-Roman bios, or biography. Ellen Birnbaum and John Dillon explain why and how this work is important within the context of Philo’s own oeuvre, early Jewish and Christian exegesis, and ancient philosophy. They also offer a new English translation and detailed analyses, in which they elucidate the meaning of Philo’s thought, including his perplexing notion that Israel’s ancestors were laws in themselves.

The Annotated Critical Laozi

With Contemporary Explication and Traditional Commentary

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Guying Chen

Edited by Paul D'Ambrosio

The Body of Evidence

Corpses and Proofs in Early Modern European Medicine

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Edited by Francesco Paolo de Ceglia

When, why and how was it first believed that the corpse could reveal ‘signs’ useful for understanding the causes of death and eventually identifying those responsible for it? The Body of Evidence. Corpses and Proofs in Early Modern European Medicine, edited by Francesco Paolo de Ceglia, shows how in the late Middle Ages the dead body, which had previously rarely been questioned, became a specific object of investigation by doctors, philosophers, theologians and jurists. The volume sheds new light on the elements of continuity, but also on the effort made to liberate the semantization of the corpse from what were, broadly speaking, necromantic practices, which would eventually merge into forensic medicine.

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Edited by Jan Bloemendal

This is an edition of the Latin text of Daniel Heinsius’ Latin tragedy Auriacus, sive Libertas saucia (Orange, or Liberty Wounded, 1602), , with an introduction, a translation and a commentary. Auriacus was Heinsius’ history drama, with which he wished to bring Dutch drama to the level of antiquity.

Euroscepticisms

The Historical Roots of a Political Challenge

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Edited by Mark Gilbert and Daniele Pasquinucci

Euroscepticism has become a political challenge of imposing size. The belief that the EU would continue, inexorably, to increase its responsibilities, its membership, and its credibility with the electorates of Europe seems like a pipedream. Almost every major European country now has a political party (whether of the left or right) that is openly opposed to the EU’s institutions and core policies. However, a political phenomenon on this scale did not spring up, mushroom-like, overnight. Sentiments, attitudes and political standpoints against the European Union have deep roots in the national histories of the various member states. This book assembles a group of scholars from across Europe to investigate the long-term origins and causes of Euroscepticism in an apposite range of EU countries.

Contributors are: Gabriele D'Ottavio, Kira Gartzou-Katsouyanni, Mark Gilbert, Adéla Gjuričová, Simona Guerra, Thorsten Borring Olesen, Daniele Pasquinucci, Emmanuelle Reungoat, Paul Taggart, Antonio Varsori, and Hans Vollaard.