Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • Archaeology, Art & Architecture x
  • All content x
  • Status (Books): Out Of Print x
Clear All

From Face to Face

Recarving of Roman Portraits and the Late-Antique Portrait Arts

Series:

Marina Prusac

This book is based on an investigation of more than 2000 portraits of which around 500 have proven to be recarved. It provides thorough analyses of the different recarving methods, some of which can be attributed to geographically localized workshops, establishing classifiable categories, and an analytical text with special regard to the cultural historical changes in Late Antiquity. The investigation underpins a hypothesis on the late antique portraits style as a consequence of the many recarved portraits at the time, which relied on a syncretism of politics, religion and ideology. The conclusion gives a new understanding of how broad-scoped, culturally and politically encoded and comprehensive the practice of recarving was.

Biblical Peoples and Ethnicity

An Archaeological Study of Egyptians, Canaanites, Philistines, and Early Israel 1300-1100 B.C.E.

Series:

Ann Killebrew

Ancient Israel did not emerge within a vacuum but rather came to exist alongside various peoples, including Canaanites, Egyptians, and Philistines. Indeed, Israel’s very proximity to these groups has made it difficult—until now—to distinguish the archaeological traces of early Israel and other contemporary groups. Through an analysis of the results from recent excavations in light of relevant historical and later biblical texts, this book proposes that it is possible to identify these peoples and trace culturally or ethnically defined boundaries in the archaeological record. Features of late second-millennium B.C.E. culture are critically examined in their historical and biblical contexts in order to define the complex social boundaries of the early Iron Age and reconstruct the diverse material world of these four peoples. Of particular value to scholars, archaeologists, and historians, this volume will also be a standard reference and resource for students and other readers interested in the emergence of early Israel.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Between Text and Artifact

Integrating Archaeology in Biblical Studies Teaching

Series:

Edited by Milton Moreland

Between Text and Artifact provides teachers of biblical studies all the tools needed to integrate the most recent archaeological information into their teaching and scholarship. Thirteen essays were commissioned for this project from archaeologists and biblical scholars who teach in undergraduate, graduate, and seminary settings. The essays give practical advice about the best available literature and audio-visual material in the field of archaeology related to the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, early Judaism, women in the ancient world, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. When viewed alongside biblical literature, the archaeological record can help create new knowledge of the items, environments, and landscapes in the Bible and of the political and social motivations for events described in the text.

Paperback edition available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Series:

Oded Borowski

While the history of Israel during the period from ca. 1200 to 586 BCE has been in the forefront of biblical research, little attention has been given to questions of daily life. Where did the Israelites live? What did people do for a living? What did they eat and what affected their health? How did the family function? These and similar questions form the basis for this book. The book introduces different aspects of daily life. It describes the natural setting and the people who occupied the land. It deals with the economy, both rural and urban, emphasizing the main sources of livelihood such as agriculture, herding, and trade. These topics are discussed in relation to the family in particular and the social structure in general. Other topics include urban society, the bureaucracy and the military. Beyond material culture, the book delves into daily and seasonal cultural, social and religious activities, art, music, and the place of writing in Israelite society. Drawing on textual and archaeological evidence, and written with nontechnical language, the book will be especially helpful for undergraduates, seminarians, pastors, rabbis, and other interested nonspecialist readers as well as graduate students and faculty in Hebrew Bible.

Paperback edition available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Ancient West & East

Volume 2, No. 1

Series:

Edited by G.R. Tsetskhladze

Jerusalem in Bible and Archaeology

The First Temple Period

Series:

Edited by J.C. von Vaupel Klein and Ann Killebrew

What are archaeologists and biblical scholars saying about Jerusalem? This volume includes the most up-to-date cross-disciplinary assessment of Biblical Jerusalem (ca. 2000-586 BCE) that represents the views of biblical historians, archaeologists, Assyriologists, and Egyptologists. The archaeological articles both summarize and critique previous theories as well as present previously unpublished archaeological data regarding the highly contested interpretations of First Temple Period Jerusalem. The interpretative essays ask the question, "Can there be any dialogue between archaeologists and biblical scholars in the absence of consensus?" The essays give a clear "yes" to this question, and provide suggestions for how archaeology and biblical studies can and should be in conversation. The contributors include Yairah Amit, Jane M. Cahill, Israel Finkelstein, Richard Elliot Friedman, Hillel Geva, James K. Hoffmeier, Ann E. Killebrew, Gary N. Knoppers, Gunnar Lehmann, Ronny Reich and Eli Shukron, J. J. M. Roberts, William M. Schniedewind, Neil Asher Silberman, Margreet Steiner, Lynn Tatum, David Ussishkin, Andrew G. Vaughn, and K. Lawson Younger, Jr. This book will appeal to advanced scholars, nonspecialists in biblical studies, and lay audiences who are interested in the most recent theories on Jerusalem. The volume will be especially useful as a supplemental textbook for graduate and undergraduate courses on biblical history.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Ancient West & East

Volume 2, No. 2

Series:

Edited by G.R. Tsetskhladze

Early Metallurgy of the Persian Gulf

Technology, Trade, and the Bronze Age World

Series:

Lloyd Weeks

This volume examines the earliest production and exchange of copper and its alloys in the Persian Gulf, a major metal supply route for the Bronze Age societies of Western Asia. Weeks addresses the geological and technological background to copper production in southeastern Arabia and contextualizes evidence for major fluctuations in prehistoric copper production. The core of the volume contists of compositional and isotopic analyses. The relationship between specialized copper production, exchange, and the development of social complexity in early Arabia is examined, and the author addresses the broader archaeological issue of the Bronze Age tin trade, which linked vast areas of Western Asia, from the Indo-Iranian borderlands to the Aegean, in the third millennium BC.

Ancient West & East

Volume 1, No. 1

Series:

Edited by G.R. Tsetskhladze

Ancient Synagogues (2 vols.)

Historical Analysis and Archaeological Discovery

Edited by Risto Ilmari Uro and Paul V.M. Flesher

The origins of the synagogue remain shrouded in mystery and its development in its early centuries is only slightly better understood. This book brings together over twenty essays from Israeli, British, and American scholars to explore the development of the ancient synagogue. Combining original articles with the best of earlier studies—including nine articles here translated from the Hebrew for the first time—this collection presents the fullest critical picture of the early synagogue and the scholarly discussions concerning it. The book focuses on two central questions. First, what were the origins of the earliest synagogues, and where did they achieve the greatest growth in the early centuries? Second, what role did the early synagogue play within the Jewish community?