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Discourses of Disease

Writing Illness, the Mind and the Body in Modern China

Edited by Howard Y. F. Choy

The meanings of disease have undergone such drastic changes with the introduction of modern Western medicine into China during the last two hundred years that new discourses have been invented to theorize illness, redefine health, and reconstruct classes and genders. As a consequence, medical literature is rewritten with histories of hygiene, studies of psychopathology, and stories of cancer, disabilities and pandemics. This edited volume includes studies of discourses about both bodily and psychiatric illness in modern China, bringing together ground-breaking scholarships that reconfigure the fields of history, literature, film, psychology, anthropology, and gender studies by tracing the pathological path of the “Sick Man of East Asia” through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries into the new millennium.

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Edited by Hiroshi Tarohmaru

Following the Asian economic crisis of the 1990s, this is the first book to examine the structure and transformation of the labor markets and social stratification of contemporary East Asia, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and China, focusing in particular on gender inequality. It deals with social mobility and gender differences in unemployment, temporary employment and self-employment. Additionally, gender segregation, social identity and suicide rates are also addressed.

Taken together, the issues raised in this volume reinforce the advantage of a comparative approach to East Asian Studies. The findings, supported by strong statistical analysis, clearly call into question a longstanding view that East Asian gender regimes and class structure are homogeneous. Indeed, this is demonstrably not the case, as Labor Markets, Gender and Social Stratification in East Asia shows, revealing as it does considerable diversities in labor markets, gender regimes, and social mobility within East Asian societies due to historical and institutional differences.

Contributors include: Chang Chin-Fen, Kim Young-Mi, Oda Akiko, Phang Hanam, Sakaguchi Yusuke, Shibata Haruka, Takamatsu Rie, Takenoshita Hirohisa, Tarohmaru Hiroshi, Xie Guihua, and Yamato Reiko.



Weaving Women's Spheres in Vietnam

The Agency of Women in Family, Religion and Community

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Edited by Atsufumi Kato

Weaving Women’s Spheres in Vietnam offers an in-depth study of the status of women in Vietnamese society through an examination of their roles in the context of family, religious and local community life from anthropological, historical and sociological perspectives. Unlike previous works on gender issues relating to Vietnam which focus on women as passive subjects and are restricted to specific spheres such as family, this book, through a series of case studies and life stories, not only examines the suppressive gender structure of the Vietnamese family, but also demonstrates Vietnamese women's agency in appropriating that structure and creating alternative spheres for women which they have interwoven in between the dominant realms of public and private spheres in the areas of family, religious practice, community organizations, and politics, including their participation in the (re)construction of national identity. Accordingly, this volume is expected to become an important new benchmark relating to gender issues in Asian societies, especially in the context of so-called ‘transitional’ societies, such as China and Vietnam.

Contributors include: Kirsten W. Endres, Ito Mariko, Ito Miho, Kato Atsufumi , Hy V. Luong, Miyazawa Chihiro, Thien-Huong T. Ninh, Tran Thi Minh Thi.