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Maps in Newspapers

Approaches to Study and Practices in Portraying War since the 19th Century

André Reyes Novaes

Abstract

Maps in newspapers generated many discussions among cartographers and geographers working from different approaches and theoretical backgrounds. This work examines these maps from a historiographical as well as a historical perspective. It considers three main questions, namely how maps in the press should be conceptualized, how cartographic images in newspapers have been studied, and how these images changed over time. In order to provide a perspective on the origins, development, and impact of war maps in the press, this work will explore maps representing three geopolitical conflicts for Brazilian audiences: The War of the Triple Alliance (1864–1870), World War II (1939–1945) and the War on Drugs in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas (1994–2010). By exploring these war maps, specific cartographic practices used in this genre as well as the connections that this mode has with other types of map production and consumption will be identified.

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

Apocalyptic Cartography

Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

In Apocalyptic Cartography: Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript, Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines analyse Huntington Library HM 83, an unstudied manuscript produced in Lübeck, Germany. The manuscript contains a rich collection of world maps produced by an anonymous but strikingly original cartographer. These include one of the earliest programs of thematic maps, and a remarkable series of maps that illustrate the transformations that the world was supposed to undergo during the Apocalypse. The authors supply detailed discussion of the maps and transcriptions and translations of the Latin texts that explain the maps. Copies of the maps in a fifteenth-century manuscript in Wolfenbüttel prove that this unusual work did circulate.

A brief article about this book on the website of National Geographic can be found here.

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines