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Abstract

The forty-one years between the Society of Jesus’s papal suppression in 1773 and its eventual restoration in 1814 remain controversial, with new research and interpretations continually appearing. Shore’s narrative approaches these years, and the period preceding the suppression, from a new perspective that covers individuals not usually discussed in works dealing with this topic. As well as examining the contributions of former Jesuits to fields as diverse as ethnology—a term and concept pioneered by an ex-Jesuit—and library science, where Jesuits and ex-Jesuits laid the groundwork for the great advances of the nineteenth century, the essay also explores the period the exiled Society spent in the Russian Empire. It concludes with a discussion of the Society’s restoration in the broader context of world history.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
Brill’s Encyclopedia of Global Pentecostalism (BEGP) provides a comprehensive overview of worldwide Pentecostalism from a range of disciplinary perspectives. It offers analysis at the level of specific countries and regions, historical figures, movements and organizations, and particular topics and themes. The online version of the Encyclopedia is already available. See here.

Pentecostal Studies draws upon areas of research such as anthropology, biblical studies, economics, gender studies, global studies, history, political science, sociology, theological studies, and other areas of related interest. The BEGP emphasizes this multi-disciplinary approach and includes scholarship from a range of disciplines, methods, and theoretical perspectives. Moreover, the BEGP is cross-cultural and transnational, including contributors from around the world to represent key insights on Pentecostalism from a range of countries and regions.
Providing summaries of the key literature, the BEGP will be the standard reference for Pentecostal Studies. All articles are organized alphabetically with bibliographic information on scholarly work and directions for further reading.

• 62 important themes & topics in Pentecostalism
• Biographies of 129 historical figures
• Ca. 70 Pentecostal Movements & Organizations
• Development of Pentecostalism in 78 countries
• 5 Regional articles: Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, Latin-America
Essays in Honor of Susan C. Karant-Nunn
This volume honors the work of a scholar who has been active in the field of early modern history for over four decades. In that time, Susan Karant-Nunn’s work challenged established orthodoxies, pushed the envelope of historical genres, and opened up new avenues of research and understanding, which came to define the contours of the field itself. Like this rich career, the chapters in this volume cover a broad range of historical genres from social, cultural and art history, to the history of gender, masculinity, and emotion, and range geographically from the Holy Roman Empire, France, and the Netherlands, to Geneva and Austria. Based on a vast array of archival and secondary sources, the contributions open up new horizons of research and commentary on all aspects of early modern life.

The contributors are: James Blakeley, Robert J. Christman, Victoria Christman, Amy Nelson Burnett, Pia Cuneo, Ute Lotz-Heumann, Amy Newhouse, Marjorie Elizabeth Plummer, Helmut Puff, Lyndal Roper, Karen E. Spierling, James D. Tracy, Mara R. Wade, David Whitford, and Charles Zika
In Argument is War: Relevance-Theoretic Comprehension of the Conceptual Metaphor of War in the Apocalypse, Clifford T. Winters demonstrates that the Apocalypse is rather telling the story of the gospel: how Christ will restore Israel and, through them, the rest of the world. When Revelation is viewed through the corrective lens of cognitive linguistics, its violence becomes victory, its violent characters become Christ, and its bloody end becomes the blessed beginning of the New Jerusalem. Revelation is simply telling the story of the early church (the Gospels and Acts) to the early church, and it is using a conceptual metaphor (‘ARGUMENT IS WAR’) to do it.
New Perspectives in Systematic Theology in Light of Nineteenth Century Catholic Renewal
In Carlo Passaglia on Church and Virgin, Valfredo Maria Rossi traces the significant contribution that Carlo Passaglia (1812-1887) has made to Catholic theology, paying particular attention to his Trinitarian ecclesiology and Mariology. Though highly neglected due to his troubled life, Passaglia is one of the most brilliant theologians of the nineteenth century. Commonly – and yet erroneously – ascribed to the Neo-Scholastic movement, he anticipates and so emerges as a forerunner of several themes which will be developed during the Second Vatican Council.

In light of Passaglia’s two most relevant theological works ( De Ecclesia Christi and De Immaculato Deiparae semper Virginis Conceptu), Rossi convincingly shows the originality of Passaglia’s theology, based on a patristic ressourcement highlighting its historical salvific and sacramental dimension.
The full significance of Cecil Henry Polhill (1860-1938), the wealthy squire of Howbury Hall, is known to few, yet he was one of the founding fathers of the Pentecostal-Charismatic tradition in Britain, and his impact and legacy stretch far beyond British shores to North America, the Far East and elsewhere. In Cecil Polhill: Missionary, Gentleman and Revivalist John Usher comprehensively connects Polhill's early life and former experiences as an Evangelical Anglican missionary in China, a member of the Cambridge Seven, with his time as a pioneer of early Pentecostalism, and in doing so reveals a much more richly contoured and multifaceted picture of the development of early Pentecostalism than previously achieved.
The Gouda Windows (1552-1572): Art and Catholic Renewal on the Eve of the Dutch Revolt offers the first complete analysis of the cycle of monumental Renaissance stained-glass windows donated to the Sint Janskerk in Gouda, after a fire gutted it in 1552. Central among the donors were king Philip II of Spain and bishop of Utrecht Joris van Egmond, who worked together to reform the Church. The inventor of the iconographic program, a close associate to the bishop as well as the king, strove to renew Catholic art by taking the words of Jesus as a starting point. Defining Catholic religion based on widely accepted biblical truths, the ensemble shows that the Mother Church can accommodate all true Christians.
Johannine Christology provides a snapshot of the foremost investigations of this important topic by a selection of scholars representing a range of expertise in this field. The volume is organized into four major parts, which are concerned with the formation of Johannine Christology, Johannine Christology in Hellenistic and Jewish contexts, Christology and the literary character of the Johannine writings, and the application of Christology for the Johannine audience and beyond.

The fifteen contributors to this volume comprise an international set of Johannine scholars who explore various ways of both describing and then pursuing the implications of Johannine Christology. Their contributions focus primarily upon the Gospel, but involve other key texts as well.
In Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing Daniel De Haan explicates the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysical masterpiece. De Haan argues that the most fundamental primary notion in Avicenna’s metaphysics is neither being nor thing but is the necessary ( wājib), which Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence in itself. This conclusion is established through a systematic investigation of how Avicenna’s theory of a demonstrative science is employed in the organization of his metaphysical science into its subject, first principles, and objects of enquiry. The book examines the essential role the first principles as primary notions and primary hypotheses play in the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysics.
In Violence in the Hebrew Bible scholars reflect on texts of violence in the Hebrew Bible, as well as their often problematic reception history. Authoritative texts and traditions can be rewritten and adapted to new circumstances and insights. Texts are subject to a process of change. The study of the ways in which these (authoritative) biblical texts are produced and/or received in various socio-historical circumstances discloses a range of theological and ideological perspectives. In reflecting on these issues, the central question is how to allow for a given text’s plurality of possible and realised meanings while also retaining the ability to form critical judgments regarding biblical exegesis. This volume highlight that violence in particular is a fruitful area to explore this tension.