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Paintings, Drawings and Prints up to the Nineteenth Century
This lavishly illustrated book provides an overview of all known Dutch and Flemish artists up to the nineteenth century, who painted or drew flower pieces, or else made prints of them. In cases where only a single example is known, or even if nothing of their work appears to have survived, it is included or mentioned in this book. This comprehensive approach differs, therefore, from mainstream art historical studies, which almost always deal primarily with famous artists and well-known works of art. The flower pieces in this book can be found in the care of museums, in the hands of art dealers and in the possession of private collectors. The aim is to show at least one image by as many artists as possible. Particularly noteworthy and useful are the many lists identifying the names of flowers, insects and other animals, which are provided for choice examples of flower pieces as case studies of work by particular artists. Other themes covered in this scholarly monograph include discussions on the earliest depictions of the flower still life, the distinctive characteristics behind the development of floral arrangements during different periods, including the variation of the flowers, the variety of techniques employed by artists, as well as an examination of the symbolism behind the numerous plant and animal species portrayed.
(Diptera: Syrphidae)
The Atlas of the Hoverflies of Greece is the first of a kind within the Mediterranean region. It is the result of decades of research, many travels into the fascinating habitats of Greece (a biodiversity hotspot), visits to world museums, and many people’s passion for hoverflies.
The Atlas is a concise presentation of all 418 hoverfly species for Greece known so far. The species are documented with photos and distribution GIS-maps and they are preceded by a general introduction on the hoverflies and Greek nature, and a generic key.
The Atlas of the Hoverflies of Greece is a handbook for insect aficionados, students and teachers, everyone interested in nature, and managers and conservationists aiming at raising public awareness of a nature nowadays threatened more than ever.

Abstract

The present study investigated how auxin concentration and the method of application affected the formation of adventitious roots in microshoots of chestnut (Castanea sativa) and oak (Quercus robur). The activity of two urea derivatives (2, 3-MDPU and 3, 4-MDPU) was also evaluated. Microshoots were derived from basal sprouts of two mature chestnut trees (P1 and P2) and one adult oak genotype (Sainza). In chestnut, rooting percentage was positively affected by auxin in a dose-dependent manner, particularly in shoots treated with the hormone for 24 h. The effect of auxin on rooting also differed depending on the application method. In shoots treated for 24 h, the highest concentration of auxin produced the healthiest rooted plantlets, in terms of the root system and shoot quality. By contrast, in shoots treated by the basal quick-dip method, the shoot quality was best at the lowest auxin concentration. The effect of urea derivatives on the root system depended on the species as well as on the auxin concentration and application period. Use of the MDPUs improved the root system architecture of auxin-treated shoots by promoting lateral root development and triggering the synchronous initiation of root primordia at the base of the shoot. Shoot quality was also improved by MDPUs, which promoted resumption of growth and reduced shoot-tip necrosis.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Abstract

Adventitious rooting of cuttings is a complex developmental process in forest species, with several exogenous and endogenous factors influencing the outcome of the process. In this study we applied an in vitro working system, comprising two lines of microshoots with the same genotype but at a different ontogenetic stages, in two different tree species (chestnut and oak). We analyzed the expression of a gene encoding an AP2/ERF transcription factor from group VII in the initial hours of the adventitious rooting induction, both in rooting competent and incompetent microshoots. The analysis revealed that expression of this gene is related to wounding, ontogenetic stage and auxin in a complex and species-specific manner. Putative induction of the gene by auxin was also analyzed in the presence of naphthyl-phthalamic acid (NPA), an auxin transport inhibitor. In situ expression analysis in chestnut relates the gene activity to cambial divisions and root primordia in rooting competent microshoots, as well as in the root apex. The putative role of the gene during adventitious roots formation is discussed.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Abstract

Lateral organs are formed in plants by post embryonic developmental programs. Leaves, and flowers differentiate from the shoot apical meristem and lateral roots from the primary root pericycle meristem. Adventitious roots are roots formed from non-root lateral meristematic tissues, mostly the cambium, in many cases in response to stress signals. The ability of plants to regenerate adventitious roots is fundamental for selection and breading programs which are based on vegetative propagation of elite clones. Thus, recalcitrant plants, losing their rooting capability, may form a genuine commercial barrier in agricultural and forestry improvement programs. Some cellular mechanisms underlying adventitious root formation have been revealed, but much is yet to be clarified. The plant primary cell wall is a dynamic organ that can change its form, and perceive and relay molecular signals inward and outward during certain stages of development in particular cells. Therefore, before the secondary cell wall is deposited and plants become the wood from which walls and furniture are built, and the fibers from which cloths are woven, primary cell walls actively participate in plant cell differentiation and developmental programs. While auxin is a major regulator, cell walls are important in regulating coherent formative cell division and synchronized polar elongation of cell lineages that are necessary for lateral organ induction and formation, and collaborative cell functioning. Nevertheless, little is known of how cell wall changes are molecularly sensed and translated to intracellular signals during differentiation of adventitious roots. Here we summarize recent data linking, directly or indirectly, cell wall events to auxin signaling and to lateral or adventitious root induction and formation.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Drought and flooding are environmental extremes and major threats to crop production. Water uptake is achieved by plant roots which have to explore new soil spaces to alleviate water deficit during drought or to cope with water excess during flooding. Adaptation of the root system architecture helps plants cope with such extreme conditions and is crucial for plant health and survival. While for dicot plants the well studied model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has provided insight into the genetic and molecular regulation of the root system, less information is available for monocot species, which include the agronomically important cereal crops. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a semi-aquatic monocot plant that develops strong tolerance to flooding. Flooding tolerance of rice is closely linked to its adaptive root system. The functional root system of rice is mainly composed of crown roots and is shifted to nodal adventitious roots during flooding which allows rice to maintain oxygen supply to the roots and to survive longer periods of partial submergence as compared with other crops. Likewise, a number of drought-tolerance traits of rice are the result of an altered root system architecture. Hence, the structure of the root system adapts to, both, flooding and drought. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control root system adaptation to extreme environments is a key task for scientists to accelerate the breeding efforts for stress-tolerant crops. This review summarizes recently identified genes and molecular mechanisms that regulate root system architecture in rice in response to drought and flooding.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Passiflora suberosa L. (Passifloraceae) can be found throughout the Americas, and has several medicinal properties, including antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-hemolytic, hypolipidemic, and hypoglycemic activities. Germination rates of P. suberosa are low, even with dormancy breaking treatments, posing an obstacle for its multiplication. Vegetative propagation is a valuable approach to produce clones of elite individuals with important pharmacological characteristics, affording fast genetic improvement of biomass source for both phytomedicine manufacturing and bioactive compound isolation. Understanding the rooting process of this species is an important step to exploit its full potential in a sustainable way. We investigated adventitious rooting (AR) in absence or presence of exogenous auxin in P. suberosa cuttings, using a non-aerated hydroponic system. Changes in concentration of flavonoids, phenolics, hexoses, starch, and auxin, as well as peroxidase activity, were monitored along AR. Cuttings showed spontaneous rooting, although the application of exogenous indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) yielded higher number of shorter roots. Biochemical parameters, mainly concentration of carbohydrates and total phenolics, as well as peroxidase activity, varied along the course of the experiments. Based on these results, attempts were made to up- or down-modulate rooting responses by applying putative regulators to the growth solution at different time points. It was possible to block the positive effect of auxin on root development, with only minor positive impacts on the modulated control devoid of auxin. Overall analyses suggested that the rooting system proved effective and specific peroxidase activity showed partial correlation with AR, being able to suffer modulation by culture solution factors.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Summer and autumn in Israel are highly arid with not enough plants in bloom offering nectar and pollen to support the local apiary. This leads to decline in colony health and honey production. To increase food sources for honeybees, we initiated a project to clone elite Eucalyptus trees exhibiting constant and rich blooming from late summer to early winter. We induced adventitious roots from cuttings of two mature Eucalyptus trees of which nectar production and honeybees’ attraction was measured: Eucalyptus brachyphylla and Eucalyptus x trabutii. During the rooting process, a high frequency of cylindrical callus formation instead of roots was obtained. To shed light on the inner anatomy of the callus chunks, we compared their cell organization and cell-wall composition to those of roots. Whereas in the root, cells were organized in circumferential symmetry, no symmetry was found in the callus. Instead, a more chaotic accumulation of meristematic-like cells with sporadic clusters of tracheary elements laid in different directions were observed. The outer cell layer of the callus often included swollen cells with thin cell walls. Most callus cells stained more strongly for cellulose and lignin than cells in the root meristem. In addition, specific antibodies to methylesterified and de-methylesterified pectin showed differential staining of callus vs. root cells indicating cell wall differences. Strikingly, roots were seen to differentiate from the chaotic cell organization of the callus, albeit at low rates. Further investigation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying callus formation, are required.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

In vitro propagation of the ornamentally interesting species Wikstroemia gemmata is limited by the recalcitrance to form adventitious roots. In this article, two strategies to improve the rooting capacity of in vitro microcuttings are presented. Firstly, the effect of exogenous auxin was evaluated in both light and dark cultivated stem segments and also the sucrose-content of the medium was varied in order to determine better rooting conditions. Secondly, different spectral lights were evaluated and the effect on shoot growth and root induction demonstrated that the exact spectral composition of light is important for successful in vitro growth and development of Wikstroemia gemmata. We show that exogenous auxin cannot compensate for the poor rooting under unfavorable light conditions. Adapting the culture conditions is therefore paramount for successful industrial propagation of Wikstroemia gemmata.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Plant-essential oils have been considered as an important source of bioactive molecules like antimicrobials, analgesics, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogen agents. Biological functions of plant extracts from the genus Capsicum are unknown. In the present work, non-polar fractions of ripe and unripe fruits of Capsicum chinense Jacq. Cultivar (cv.) Jaguar and Criollo were obtained by hexane-batch extraction and tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacterial strain Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Gram-positive bacterial strains Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228), and yeast Candida albicans (ATCC 90028). Non-polar fractions from ripe fruits for both cv. exhibited greater antimicrobial activity compared to unripe fruits. Implication of numbered FFA’s on observed antimicrobial activity are discussed.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences