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Abstract

In this essay, I examine how the book of Ezekiel has been employed or criticized as a resource for environmental ethics, and I explore the hermeneutical strategies behind these efforts. To do this, I make use of David Horrell’s critique and taxonomy of how the Bible has been used to inform attitudes about the environment. I conclude by arguing that while the book of Ezekiel is not as ecologically dangerous as some readers have claimed, neither can it function on its own as a useful tool for constructing an environmental ethic. However, reading Ezekiel as part of a metanarrative generated by a larger scriptural corpus may render its imagery useful as a resource.

Open Access
In: Horizons in Biblical Theology

Abstract

This article uses narrative criticism and a study of the word neaniskos in Greek culture to argue that the Gethsemanic young man and the young man in Jesus’ open tomb are linked by comedy. It demonstrates that the naked young man pericope utilizes comic imitation and the word neaniskos to connote comic behavior. With the naked young man as a model, the article proceeds to show that the speech of the messenger in the open tomb is comedy vis-à-vis the narrative of the context. This interpretation has the advantages of explaining the ill-fitting interruption of the naked young man scene in Gethsemane, of making sense of the abrupt ending of the Gospel of Mark, and of fitting the use of the word neaniskos in the Gospel of Mark to a connotation used in classical and Hellenistic Greek culture.

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology
Author: Matthew J. Klem

Abstract

John 2:17 quotes Ps 68:10: “Zeal for your house will consume me.” Interpreters disagree about whether consume portrays Jesus’s zeal overwhelming him during the temple incident or leading to his death. They also disagree about whether John alludes metaleptically to the whole psalm, especially the rebuilding of Jerusalem in Ps 68:36–37. This article argues that consume portrays Jesus’s death. It substantiates that John alludes to the whole psalm, not only the rebuilding of Jerusalem in 68:36–37, but also the table becoming a trap and the pouring out of wrath in 68:23, 25. These echoes suggest that Jesus embodies the judgment of God in the temple incident, the suffering of the psalmist in his death, and the restoration of Jerusalem in his resurrection. The story from the Psalter is thus reconfigured in the temple incident: God rebuilds the forsaken city by identifying with Israel’s exile in the crucified body of Jesus.

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology
Author: Adam F. Braun

Abstract

This paper argues that the operative force in Luke’s parable of The Rich Fool is negativity. Moreover, negativity is as common in Lukan parables as status reversals. As the parable warns against securing the future, this paper reads Lee Edelman’s No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive to show how negativity, towards reproductive futurism in particular, activates Luke’s pessimism. This pessimism is grounded in the crucifixion and is not resolved in the resurrection. Luke’s pessimism is not only one which expresses his affective diasporic context, but it also invokes doubt on whether Jesus is messiah.

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology