Browse results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 248 items for :

  • Laws of the Middle East x
  • All content x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All
This book is dedicated to an analysis of seven groups of hadiths related to matters ranging from the rules concerning water used for ablution to those concerning the proof of facts in a qadi court. It has three main purposes. The first is to clarify the processes by which hadiths on a given topic were formed and developed by analyzing their isnāds and matns and by comparing them with expositions of positive law in legal manuals. Second, it seeks to explain why many hadiths exist in multiple variants and to detect the perception of traditionists about the revision of hadiths. The third purpose is to propose a methodology to estimate the extent to which traditionists accepted hadiths on a particular topic.
Historical Explorations
International Law and Islam: Historical Explorations offers a unique opportunity to examine the Islamic contribution to the development of international law in historical perspective. The role of Islam in its various intellectual, political and legal manifestations within the history of international law is part of the exciting intellectual renovation of international and global legal history in the dawn of the twenty-first century. The present volume is an invitation to engage with this thriving development after ‘generations of prejudiced writing’ regarding the notable contribution of Islam to international law and its history.
Legal Theory, Codification, and Local Practice
Islamic foundations ( waqf, pl. awqāf) have been an integral part of Yemeni society both for managing private wealth and as a legal frame for charity and public infrastructure. This book focuses on four socially grounded fields of legal knowledge: fiqh, codification, individual waqf cases, and everyday waqf-related knowledge. It combines textual analysis with ethnography and seeks to understand how Islamic law is approached, used, produced, and validated in selected topics of waqf law where there are tensions between ideals and pragmatic rules. The study analyses central Zaydī fiqh works such as the Sharḥ al-azhār cluster, imamic decrees, fatwās, and waqf documents, mostly from Zaydī, northern Yemen.
Editors: John Bowen and Arskal Salim
In Women and Property Rights in Indonesian Islamic Contexts, eight scholars of Indonesian Islam examine women’s access to property in law courts and in village settings. The authors draw on fieldwork from across the archipelago to analyse how judges and ordinary people apply interpretations of law, religion, and gender in deliberating and deciding in property disputes that arise at moments of marriage, divorce, and death. The chapters go beyond the world of legal and scriptural texts to ask how women in fact fare in these contexts. Women’s capabilities and resources in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim society and one with distinctive traditions of legal and social life, provides a critical knowledge base for advancing our understanding of the social life of Islamic law. Contributors: Nanda Amalia, John R. Bowen, Tutik Hamidah, Abidin Nurdin, Euis Nurlaelawati, Arskal Salim, Rosmah Tami & Atun Wardatun.
The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law (YIMEL) is the leading English language journal covering contemporary Islamic laws and laws of the Middle East. Practitioners and academics dealing with the Middle East can turn to YIMEL for an instant source of information on the developments in the Middle East region and wider Muslim world. YIMEL covers Islamic and non-Islamic legal subjects, including the laws themselves, of some twenty Arab and other Islamic countries. Focusing on YIMEL's role in publishing and disseminating ground-breaking and novel research on Islamic law, Volume 19 includes a Special Edition on the theme of Islamic Law and Empire consisting of a dedicated Preface and articles in Part I, as well as other contributions on legal developments in the Middle East and South Asia, important judgements and book reviews, assembled in Part II.

The publication's practical features include: - articles on current topics, - the text of a selection of important case judgments, - book reviews. Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law.
In Beyond Schools: Muḥammad b. Ibrāhīm al-Wazīrʼs (d. 840/1436) Epistemology of Ambiguity, Damaris Wilmers provides the first extensive analysis of Ibn al-Wazīrʼs thought and its role in the “Sunnisation of the Zaydiyya”, emphasizing its significance for conflicts between schools of thought and law beyond the Yemeni context. Contrasting Ibn al-Wazīrʼs works with those of his Zaydi contemporary Aḥmad b. Yaḥyā b. al-Murtaḍā, Damaris Wilmers offers a study of a number of heretofore unedited texts from 9th/15th century Yemen when Zaydi identity was challenged by an increasing theological and legal diversity. She shows how Ibn al-Wazīr, who has been classed with different schools, actually de-emphasized school affiliation and developed an integrative approach based on a unique theory of knowledge.
A Journey Through International Law, History and Politics
In The Iran-UAE Gulf Islands Dispute, Charles Buderi and Luciana Ricart take the reader on a journey through centuries of Gulf history and evolving principles of international law on territorial disputes to reach conclusions over the rightful sovereign of three Gulf islands – Abu Musa and the Tunbs – claimed by both Iran and the United Arab Emirates. Drawing on a wide range of scholarly works and archival documents from sources as diverse as the Dutch East India Company, the Ottoman Empire and the British Government, Buderi and Ricart analyze historical events from antiquity up to modern times. Ultimately, the authors reach conclusions on the ownership of the islands under international law which challenge the positions of both parties.
In spite of its privileged place on the African continent, in the Muslim world and in the Middle East and North Africa region, Algeria remains poorly known, and the works relating to contemporary Algerian society published outside of Algeria are rare. This book seeks to contribute to our understanding of Algerian society today, through its relationships to property and to law. Beyond this, the objective is to propose, in a comparative perspective proper to anthropology, new theoretical and methodological perspectives by which to apprehend the anthropology of law in a Muslim context. Algeria, as a post-colonial and post-Socialist State, whose population is overwhelmingly Muslim, proves to be a particularly interesting case to study.

Contributors are: Hichem Amichi, Emilie Barraud, Ammar Belhimer, Yazid Ben Hounet, Nejm Benessaiah, Sami Bouarfa, Tarik Dahou, Baudouin Dupret, Marcel Kuper, Judith Scheele, Alice Wilson.
By virtue of ratifying the Women’s Convention, Egypt is internationally obliged to eliminate gender discrimination in its domestic legislation. Yet, women in Egypt face various forms of discrimination. This may legally be justified through Sharia-based reservations, which many Muslim-majority countries enter to human rights treaties to evade an obligation of implementation where Human Rights run counter to Sharia. This book examines the compatibility of Sharia-based reservations with international law and identifies discrepancies between Sharia and domestic law in order to determine rights Egyptian women are entitled to according to Sharia, and yet denied under Egyptian law. Account is moreover given to Egypt’s implementation efforts in the non-reserved areas of law. To this end, Egypt’s 2014 Constitution and four areas of statutory law are examined as case studies, namely, female genital mutilation; human trafficking; nationality; and labor law.
Contemporariness, Normativeness and Competence
Islamic Commercial Law: Contemporariness, Normativeness and Competence offers new perspectives on why for centuries Islamic commercial law has been perceived as arbitrary and unpredictable, and on its evolution to a contemporary, consistent, reliable and credible body of law. The book also examines why Western positivists have viewed Islamic commercial law in a simplistic or archaic religious framework and counters those arguments with an examination of its normative legal qualities. The work analyses the competencies of Fiqh (jurisprudence) for structuring new financial instruments, and restructuring conventional financial products more equitability.