Browse results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 368 items for :

  • Literature & Linguistics x
  • Biblical Studies x
  • All content x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
In: The Semantics of Silence in Biblical Hebrew
Including a Concise Historical Morphology
The Development of the Biblical Hebrew Vowels investigates the sound changes affecting the Proto-Northwest-Semitic vocalic phonemes and their reflexes in Tiberian Biblical Hebrew. Contrary to many previous approaches, Benjamin Suchard shows that these developments can all be described as phonetically regular sound laws. This confirms that despite its unique transmission history, Hebrew behaves like other languages in this regard.
Many Hebrew sound changes have traditionally been explained as reflecting non-phonetic conditioning. These include the Canaanite Shift of *ā to *ō, tonic and pre-tonic lengthening, diphthong contraction, Philippi’s Law, the Law of Attenuation, and the apocope of short, unstressed vowels. By reconsidering reconstructions and re-evaluating phonetic conditions, this work shows how the Biblical Hebrew forms regularly derive from their Proto-Northwest-Semitic precursors.
An Exploration of Literary Divergence in Greek Narrative Discourse
Unlike contemporary literary-linguistic configurations of genre, current methodologies for the study of the Gospel genre are designed only to target genre similarities not genre differences. This basic oversight results in the convoluted discussion we witness in Lukan genre study today. Each recent treatment of the genre of Luke-Acts represents a distinct effort to draw parallels between Luke-Acts and a specific (or multiple) literary tradition(s). These studies all underestimate the role of literary divergence in genre analysis, leveraging much—if not, all—of their case on literary proximity. This monograph will show how attention to literary divergence from a number of angles may bring resolution to the increasingly complex discussions of the genre(s) of Luke-Acts.