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Un manuscrit trouvé à Dunhuang, traduit, commenté et annoté
L’Hymnaire manichéen chinois offre un ensemble de 25 hymnes destinées à la pratique de la religion manichéenne par la Section des Auditeurs. Mis au jour à Dunhuang (actuel Gansu) au début du 20ème siècle, après être resté enfoui dans une cache pendant quelque douze siècles, ce rouleau écrit en langue chinoise, comprend plusieurs hymnes transcrites de diverses langues courantes en Asie centrale à l’époque de sa rédaction.
Cette traduction apporte une vision nouvelle de la Religion de Lumière, telle qu’elle se vit adoptée par les Chinois, ainsi que de l’ampleur du message du prophète iranien Mani (216-276), aspirant à une portée universelle et destiné à relier entre eux les hommes de tous horizons de par le monde, quelque soit leur origine, leur langue ou leur histoire.



L’Hymnaire manichéen chinois presents a collection of twenty-five hymns that were intended for the Manichean religious practice of the class of Auditors. The scroll, which came to light in the early twentieth century in the province of Dunhuang (modern Ganzu) after lying buried for around twelve centuries, contains several hymns transcribed from a variety of languages that were current in Central Asia during the epoch of its redaction. This translation provides a new perspective on the Religion of Light as it was adopted in China, and on the wide reach of the message of the Iranian prophet Mani (216-276) that aimed at universal scope and was meant to unite people from all parts of the world, of whatever origin, language and history.
Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2016 volume highlights the five sub-disciplines of theology. Wang Wei-fan’s evangelical theology and Christian ecumenism and its internal contradiction is studied from a systematic theological viewpoint. Additionally, a theology of soul and body is proposed as an approach of sinicization of Christianity. Civil Christian and political identity are also studied in the relation to the sinicization of Christianity in China. The belief logic and social actions of the “Kingdom-Got sect” and the origin of “A New Treatise on Aids to Administration” have been explored from the historical perspective. The meditations of the Three-Self Church by K. H. Ting from a socio-religious perspective, and the missionaries’ resolution of the term question in The Chinese Recorder have been studied in their relations to the Bible. There are comparative studies on the unreconciled religious diversity in the dialogue of civilizations and the different views about truth in Christianity and Confucianism. The academic report analyzes the eventful year of 2010 in the Catholic Church in China. This volume offers genuine Chinese theological research, which was previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

Contributors include: Juhong Ai, Jianming Chen and Tao Xiao, Xiaojuan Cheng, Xiangping Li, Gong Liang, Jianbo Huang, Paulos Huang, Meixiu Wang, Philip L. Wickeri, Kevin Xiyi Yao, Jie Zhao, Weichi Zhou.


Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed series on Chinese theology in English. Its main focus is on interdisciplinary, contextual, and cross-cultural studies in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. The Yearbook also features articles exploring wider issues in church and society. The Yearbook of Chinese Theology thus meets the growing demand for the study of the new academic discipline of Christianity in a Chinese context.

In this first volume, harmony and Sinicization of Christianity in China are studied from a systematic theological viewpoint. Confucian Ruism and the Human-God relationship are investigated from a practical theological perspective. Articles on the rebellious Taiping tianguo movement and on a Fujian Catholic community shed light on the history of Christianity in China, and two articles draw attention to the Bible in relation to literature and general public. Furthermore, a review of the Protestant Church is offered from the viewpoint of Civil Society construction, and Chinese contemporary ideology and historical Nestorianism are researched using methodology derived from the field of Comparative Religions. This volume offers genuine Chinese theological research, which was previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

Abstract

The development of contemporary Chinese religion has its own social background. A typical characteristic of it is co-existence with globalization. The present development and future possibilities of religious existence in China should be based on the corresponding relationship with Chinese society, specifically in the contextualization of global engagement. Many people hope and believe that religion can play a very positive role(s) in contemporary China, in line with its global connection. Alhough certain problems still remain, the theme of understanding religion has a very special role within the context of the Chinese effort of constructing a harmonious society.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015

Abstract

The expression of Trinity in the Dunhuang document Zunjing 尊經 is traceable back to the ontological speculations of Antiochene theologian Theodore of Mopsuestia. By a comparative study of Theodore’s concept of qnoma ܐܡܘܢܩ and the Confucian idea of Shen 身, this paper is an attempt to retrieve the original meaning of person as “holistic-qnomic manifestation”, thereby providing a fitting analogical meaning between two central concepts, a Christian concept of person and a Chinese concept of shen 身.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015

Abstract

This paper is based on a review of the work and various activities of Protestant churches in China, in order to understand the efforts that are being made by them to approach a civil society under construction. This entire paper can be divided into six parts: I. Chinese civil society under Construction and functional orientation of Protestant churches in China; II. Specific approaches to a civil society: social service and social care; III. Foundation of approaching a civil society: theology and church organizations construction; IV. International vision required for approaching a civil society: promotion of overseas exchange; V. Sustaining motive power of approaching a civil society: self-cognition and introspection; VI. Conclusion. This paper holds that the “factors of civil society” that Protestant churches in China contain have presented themselves in various ways in recent years. This is a good foundation for Protestantism in China to engage in the construction of civil society, providing contributions for a harmonious society.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015

Abstract

This essay investigates the “Sinicization of Christianity” from an academic standpoint. The goal of this essay is: The objective and rational discussion on how Christianity could be able to meld into Chinese culture, the Chinese nation, and in particular, contemporary Chinese society. The investigation is presented in three parts: a comparison between the histories of Christianity in China and Korea, a study of the ecological situation of religions in contemporary China, and, finally, new developments in international research on inter-religious dialogue. The article concludes that social practice should be the main criterion for testing religious faith. Furthermore, based on China’s current conditions, the best course for the Sinicization of Christianity is its achieving positive and important contributions to the continued reform and opening-up of Chinese society as well as to its development and progress.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015

Abstract

Having characterized the severe planetary environmental problems faced in our age, this article seeks to apply a revised form of the dialectics of harmonization promoted by Prof. Chung-ying Cheng, originally articulated in 1977 to approach a 21st century Ruist ( “Confucian”)-inspired environmental ethics. The content of this article is portrayed under seven “meditations” as follows, and each taking a relatively different dialectical step to arrive at some new concepts and ethical arguments to justify this particular form of environmental ethics. First, the immense irony within China is that some contemporary Ruist (and Buddhist and Daoist) scholars have written about environmental ethics, portraying an image that suggests that there are great historical traditions related to this realm. Nevertheless, even as late as 2013 the two most polluted cities in the contemporary world are in China (Linfen and Tianying). Secondly, it is argued that the insights of Jacques Ellul’s critiques of technological society and its systematic values have not been adequately conceptualized in traditional Ruist ethics, and so becomes a shortcoming of contemporary Ruist-inspired environmental ethics (which tend to advocate a “union or harmony of Heaven and humans”, allowing no special place for techno-scientific values, systems, and tools). Thirdly, symbolic resources for a “reverence for life” within different Ruist texts are explored. Fourthly, the six principles of the dialectics of harmonization promoted by Prof. Chung-ying Cheng in 1977 are presented and critically analyzed in the light of 21st century developments in the post-traditional Chinese philosophical and cultural context. Fifthly, a modulated form of the six principles of the dialectics of harmonization is elaborated in response to the critical questions raised in the previous meditation. Sixthly, a new polarity is presented, under the rubric of “artificial – human”, explored in terms of the values, powers and other aspects that are worked out in various relativities and oppositions that arise within this polarity. It is argued that this is an important addition to the list of polarities that should be included and applied through the revised version of the dialectics of harmonization. Seventh and finally, I argue that when working dialectically toward a more sensitive complimentarity within the artificial – human polarity, we should identify the subject of our reverence as the “vital environing whole”, which I further develop into a form of “familially familiar world” drawing upon Zhang Zai’s vision in The Western Inscription and adapt it to our 21st century context. It is argued that this new conception of our vital environing whole is worthy of reverence, and with the moral attitudes promoted by Zhang Zai, this conception leads us toward a feasible way to understand the “reverence for life” and can discern ways of “living with reverence” that includes not only suitable care for other living things but for our needy planetary home as well.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015

Abstract

After introducing the sevenfold dimensions of relations within the logic of the world-picture, this essay holds that there seem to be three kinds of relations between humans and God (or ‘the transcendent’/ ‘the ultimate reality’) in logic: (1) where the two oppose each other (are separate), (2) stand side by side, and (3) combine into one. This paper primarily examines the reasons why many patterns or images such as ‘rascal’, ‘giggle’, ‘boredom’, ‘abreaction’ and ‘rage’ have appeared in Chinese contemporary art since the 1990s. By describing the particular artworks of Daozi (his ‘Saint Water-ink Painting’), the Gao Bothers (their change of creation), Qian Zhusheng (his prints), Wang Lu (his oil paintings on the theme of the Bible), Ding Fang and Zhu Jiuyang (his ‘picture of the ripple’), the author proceeds to a discussion about the specific contents of these works of art. The discussion is set in the context of an overall theme, which is the relation between humanity and God. The art works themselves can be seen to be embryonic forms of this dimension in the thought-picture of Chinese contemporary art. The author draws the conclusion that Christian artists in China should connect their personal spiritual life with the cultural life of their artistic creations and in this way absorb modern artistic language, along with its individuality and sense of history. This is in order to develop the transcendental space of Chinese contemporary art, forming spirituality within its conceptual dimensions.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015

Abstract

In Taiping Rebellion documents, the Taiping Heavenly Chronicle is the first and most important book that recorded Hong Xiuquan’s 1837 vision in detail. It helps us to understand the origin of the Taiping rebellion and its Christian characteristics. The author reveals that, during the writing of the Taiping Heavenly Chronicle, Hong Xiuquan referred to the Revelation and borrowed many words, images, and themes from the latter. At the same time, as a literal interpreter, he misunderstood some words and images, and formed a new Christian heretic sect/ new religion. In the formation of the Taiping rebellion, the Bible, especially the “Revelation,” had great influence on its ideology.

In: Yearbook of Chinese Theology 2015