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The Dispute over Israel's Holiest Jewish Site, 1967–2000
The Western Wall—Judaism’s holiest site—occupies a prominent position in contemporary Jewish and Israeli discourse, current events, and local politics. In The Western Wall: The Dispute over Israel's Holiest Jewish Site, 1967–2000, Kobi Cohen-Hattab and Doron Bar offer a detailed exploration of the Western Wall plaza’s evolution in the late twentieth century. The examination covers the role of archaeology in defining the space, the Western Wall’s transformation as an Israeli and Jewish symbol, and the movement to open it to a variety of Jewish denominations. The book studies the central processes and shifts that took place at the Western Wall during the three decades that followed the Six-Day War—a relatively short yet crucial chapter in Jerusalem's extensive history.
HerausgeberInnen: Knut A. Jacobsen und Ferdinando Sardella
Handbook of Hinduism in Europe portrays and analyses how Hindu traditions have expanded across the continent, and presents the main Hindu communities, religious groups, forms, practices and teachings. The Handbook does this in two parts, Part One covers historical and thematic topics which are of importance for understanding Hinduism in Europe as a whole and Part Two have articles on Hindu traditions in every country in Europe. Hindu traditions have a long history of interaction with Europe, but the developments during the last fifty years represent a new phase. Globalization and increased ease of communication have led to the presence of a great plurality of Hindu traditions. Hinduism has become one of the major religions in Europe and is present in every country of the continent.
Between Churchification and Securitization
In Islam in Post-communist Eastern Europe: Between Churchification and Securitization Egdūnas Račius reveals how not only the governance of religions but also practical politics in post-communist Eastern Europe are permeated by the strategies of churchification and securitization of Islam. Though most Muslims and the majority of researchers of Islam hold to the view that there may not be church in Islam, material evidence suggests that the representative Muslim religious organizations in many Eastern European countries have been effectively turned into ecclesiastical-bureaucratic institutions akin to nothing less than ‘national Muslim Churches’. As such, these ‘national Muslim Churches’ themselves take an active part in securitization, advanced by both non-Muslim political and social actors, of certain forms of Islamic religiosity.
On Dialectical Religiology
HerausgeberIn: Dustin J. Byrd
In The Critique of Religion and Religion’s Critique: On Dialectical Religiology, Dustin J. Byrd compiles numerous essays honouring the life and work of the Critical Theorist, Rudolf J. Siebert. His “dialectical religiology,” rooted in the critical theory of the Frankfurt School, especially Theodor Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin, Herbert Marcuse, Erich Fromm, Leo Löwenthal, and Jürgen Habermas, is both a theory and method of understanding religion’s critique of modernity and modernity’s critique of religion. Born out of the Enlightenment and its most important thinkers, i.e. Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, religion is understood to be dialectical in nature. It contains within it both revolutionary and emancipatory elements, but also reactionary and regressive elements, which perpetuate mankind’s continual debasement, enslavement, and oppression. Thus, religion by nature is conflicted within itself and thus stands against itself. Dialectical Religiology attempts to rescue those elements of religion from the dustbin of history and reintroduce them into society via their determinate negation. As such, it attempts to resolve the social, political, theological, and philosophical antagonisms that plague the modern world, in hopes of producing a more peaceful, justice-filled, equal, and reconciled society. The contributors to this book recognize the tremendous contributions of Dr. Rudolf J. Siebert in the fields of philosophy, sociology, history, and theology, and have profited from his long career. This book attempts to honour that life and work.

Contributors include: Edmund Arens, Gregory Baum, Francis Brassard, Dustin J. Byrd, Denis R. Janz, Gottfried Küenzlen, Mislav Kukoč, Michael, R. Ott, Rudolf J. Siebert, Hans K. Weitensteiner, and Brian C. Wilson.
Revised, Enlarged and Updated Second Edition
Islam in South Asia: Revised, Enlarged and Updated Second Edition traces the roots and development of Muslim presence in South Asia. Trajectories of normative notions of state-building and the management of diversity are elaborated in four clusters, augmented by topical subjects in excursuses and annexes offering an array of Muslim voices. The enormous time span from 650 to 2019 provides for a comprehensive and plural canvas of the religious self-presentation of South Asian Muslims. Making use of the latest academic works and historical materials, including first-hand accounts ranging from official statements to poetry, Malik convincingly argues that these texts provide sufficient evidence to arrive at an interpretation of quite a different character. With major and substantial revisions, changes, abridgements and additions follow the academic literature produced during the last decades.

Abstract

Focusing on Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, “Religious Education and the Anglo-World” historiographically examines the relationship between empire and religious education. In each case the analysis centres on the foundational moments of publicly funded education in the mid- to late-nineteenth centuries when policy makers created largely Protestant systems of religious education, and frequently denied Roman Catholics funding for private education. Secondly, the period from 1880 to 1960 during which campaigns to strengthen religious education emerged in each context. Finally, the era of decolonisation from the 1960s through the 1980s when publicly funded religious education was challenged by the loss of Britishness as a central ideal, and Roman Catholics found unprecedented success in achieving state aid in many cases. By bringing these disparate national literatures into conversation with one another, the essay calls for a greater transnational approach to the study of religious education in the Anglo-World.

in Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Education
Islamic Traditions and the Construction of Modern Muslim Identities
HerausgeberInnen: Dietrich Jung und Kirstine Sinclair
With critical reference to Eisenstadt’s theory of “multiple modernities,” Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity discusses the role of religion in the modern world. The case studies all provide examples illustrating the ambition to understand how Islamic traditions have contributed to the construction of practices and expressions of modern Muslim selfhoods. In doing so, they underpin Eisenstadt’s argument that religious traditions can play a pivotal role in the construction of historically different interpretations of modernity. At the same time, however, they point to a void in Eisenstadt’s approach that does not problematize the multiplicity of forms in which this role of religious traditions plays out historically. Consequently, the authors of the present volume focus on the multiple modernities within Islam, which Eisenstadt’s theory hardly takes into account.

Abstract

Tablighi Jamaat is Islam’s largest movement with estimates of up to 80 million members. With its origins in the Indian subcontinent it has expanded to have a strong presence across the globe. Known for bringing lapsed Muslims back to a stricter understanding of Islam, Tablighi Jamaat also recommends for its male (and increasingly female) members to spend a certain portion of time each year working on the “path of Allah” – that is in missionary activities. This chapter shows how the ritualization of everyday practices, a focus on purity and mission, combined with textual (re)interpretation contribute to individual and collective identity constructions. For Tablighi Jamaat the formation of modern Muslim selfhoods is of vital importance, as the belief is that an identity centered on an authentic form of Islam can protect Muslims in a fast-changing world.

in Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity

Abstract

Algerian anti-colonialists such as Frantz Fanon or Malek Bennabi perceived colonialism primarily as a condition affecting the individual. Therefore, self-reform, or the formation of modern Muslim subjects, became the major means of decolonization. The chapter focuses on the Muslim scouts, which were connected to the Islamic reformist movement around Abdelhamid Ben Badis. Drawing on Foucault’s theory of governmentality, it argues that young Muslims were supposed to acquire self-mastery as a first step in the preparation of national independence. Thereby, Algerian anti-colonialists did not envisage a specifically Islamic modernity, opposed to Western modernity. Rather they understood themselves as a part of global modernity.

in Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity

Abstract

The Muslim Brotherhood represents an exemplary case for the discussion of Islam and modernity. Founded in 1928 by Hasan al-Banna in Egypt, it developed from a movement into a well-organized institution and a cadre party with mass appeal functioning as a social vehicle promoting a specific Islamic imagination of modernity and related forms of modern Muslim subjectivities. This chapter explores Hasan al-Banna’s ideas and their historical context. It asks how he constructed an Islamic modern social order and meaningful Muslim selfhoods. Thereby, the Muslim Brotherhood is considered an inherent part of the emergence of global modernity as “world history.”

in Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity