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Volume 1: Concepts, Perspectives, and the Emergence of Augustinian Identity
The culmination of thirty years of research, Eric Leland Saak’s Augustinian Theology in the Later Middle Ages offers a comprehensive, new interpretation of late medieval Augustinianism. The first of a two-volume work, the present book sets the stage and analyzes the conceptual and methodological structures requisite for interpreting the reception of Augustine in the later Middle Ages historically, together with explicating the first two of the four “pillars” of Augustinian theology: the Augustinian Hermits’ political theology; the teaching in the Order’s schools; the Order’s university theology; and its moral theology. Holistically fused with the Order’s religious identity, these distinct yet interconnected components of Augustinian theology, rather than a narrow, theologically defined anti-Pelagianism, provided the context for the emergence of the Reformation.
The medieval dissenters known as ‘Waldenses’, named after their first founder, Valdes of Lyons, have long attracted careful scholarly study, especially from specialists writing in Italian, French and German. Waldenses were found across continental Europe, from Aragon to the Baltic and East-Central Europe. They were long-lived, resilient, and diverse. They lived in a special relationship with the prevailing Catholic culture, making use of the Church’s services but challenging its claims.

Many Waldenses are known mostly, or only, because of the punitive measures taken by inquisitors and the Church hierarchy against them. This volume brings for the first time a wide-ranging, multi-authored interpretation of the medieval Waldenses to an English-language readership, across Europe and over the four centuries until the Reformation.

Contributors include: Marina Benedetti, Peter Biller, Luciana Borghi Cedrini, Euan Cameron, Jacques Chiffoleau, Albert De Lange, Andrea Giraudo, Franck Mercier, Grado Giovanni Merlo, Georg Modestin, Martine Ostorero, Damian J. Smith, Claire Taylor, and Kathrin Utz Tremp.
Karl Löwith, Hans Blumenberg and Carl Schmitt in Polemical Contexts
In Contesting Modernity in the German Secularization Debate, Sjoerd Griffioen investigates the polemics between Karl Löwith, Hans Blumenberg and Carl Schmitt on the role of religion in modernity. He analyzes their contribution to the development of the broader German secularization debate between the 1950’s and 1980’s. As this development is traced, special attention is paid to how after 1968 this debate increasingly centered on Schmitt’s notion of political theology and its appropriation by the Left. This is evinced in the work of Jacob Taubes, who is opposed by Odo Marquard, assuming a Blumenbergian-secularist position in this new political landscape. Griffioen concludes with a methodological reflection on the value of ‘Geistesgeschichte’ and by identifying parallels with the contemporary discourse of postsecularism.
Editors / Translators: James Colbert and Oliva Blanchette
Gaston Fessard, S.J. (1897-1978), was a major mid-twentieth century French intellectual. He was a Hegel expert, but also wrote on issues of the day ranging from the Vichy regime to Christian-Marxist dialogue. The product of several decades of reflection, Fessard’s work on the Dialectic of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola is the only one of its kind, a careful and penetrating study into the structure and tension of life-changing choices that Ignatius had in mind in his four week spiritual exercises. The Exercises insist on the way of making a spiritual Election, or choice in keeping with God’s will for oneself and for the Christian community at a particular moment in one’s existence.
The History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia
Author: Brian Douglas
In The Anglican Eucharist in Australia, Brian Douglas explores the History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia. The story begins with the first white settlement in 1788 and continues to the present day. The three eucharistic liturgies used in the ACA, and the debates that led to them, are examined in depth: The Book of Common Prayer (1662); An Australian Prayer Book (1978); and A Prayer Book for Australia (1995). The deep sacramentality of the Aboriginal people is acknowledged and modern issues such as liturgical development, lay presidency and virtual Eucharists are also explored. The book concludes with some suggestions for the further development of eucharistic liturgies within the ACA.
Arabs and Arabists contains nineteen selected articles by Alastair Hamilton on the Western acquisition of knowledge of the Arab and Ottoman world in the early modern period. The first essays are on Arabs who visited Europe and gave instruction to Western Arabists, and on Europeans who either visited the Arab (or the Ottoman) world in search of manuscripts and information or who, like Franciscus Raphelengius, Isaac Casaubon and Adriaen Reland, studied it at a distance and remained in the West. These are followed by a section on the actual study of the Arabic language in Europe, and above all the creation of the first Arabic-Latin dictionaries, and another on the European study of Islam and Western translations of the Qur’an.
Catholic Debates at the Time of Trent.
With an Edition and Translation of Key Documents.
Author: Wietse de Boer
The Catholic Church answered Reformation-era contestations of the cult of images in a famous decree of the Council of Trent (1563). Art in Dispute revisits this response by focusing on its antecedents rather than its consequences. The mid-sixteenth century saw, besides new scholarship on Byzantine doctrines, heated debates about neo-scholastic interpretations. Disagreement, suppressed at Trent but re-emerging soon afterwards, centered on the question whether religious images were solely signs referring to holy subjects or also sacred objects in their own right. It was a debate with major implications for art theory and devotional practice.

The volume contains editions and translations of texts by Martín Pérez de Ayala, Matthieu Ory, Jean Calvin, Ambrogio Catarino Politi, and Iacopo Nacchianti, along with a previously unknown draft of the Tridentine decree.
This book brings together the disciplines of history and psychology. It is the first study to apply attachment theory to self-narratives of the past, namely examples of life-writing (letters and proto-autobiographies) from medieval England, written in broad religious contexts. It examines whether God could appear as an adequate attachment figure in times of high mortality and often inadequate childrearing practices, and whether the emphasis on God’s proximity to believers benefited their psychological reorganisation. The main method of enquiry is discourse analysis based on the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) coding.
Contributor: Angela Ellis
A Companion to Catholicism and Recusancy in Britain and Ireland is an edited collection of nineteen essays written by a range of experts and some newer scholars in the areas of early modern British and Irish history and religion. In addition to English Catholicism, developments in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, as well as ongoing connections and interactions with Continental Catholicism, are well incorporated throughout the volume. Many currents of the latest scholarship are addressed and advanced, including religious minorities and exiles, women and gender studies, literary and material culture, religious identity construction, and, within Catholic studies, the role of laity as well as clergy, and of female as well as male religious. In all, these essays significantly advance the movement of early modern British and Irish Catholicism from the historiographical margins to an evolving, but ultimately more capacious and accurate, historical mainstream.