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Author: Josef van Ess
Theology and Society is the most comprehensive study of Islamic intellectual and religious history, focusing on Muslim theology. With its emphasis on the eighth and ninth centuries CE, it remains the most detailed prosopographical study of the early phase of the formation of Islam. Originally published in German between 1991 and 1995, Theology and Society is a monument of scholarship and a unique scholarly enterprise which has stood the test of the time as an unparalleled reference work. The Indices consist of a General index and a separate Index of Works.
Author: Josef van Ess
Translator: Renee Otto
Theology and Society is the most comprehensive study of Islamic intellectual and religious history, focusing on Muslim theology. With its emphasis on the eighth and ninth centuries CE, it remains the most detailed prosopographical study of the early phase of the formation of Islam. Originally published in German between 1991 and 1995, Theology and Society is a monument of scholarship and a unique scholarly enterprise which has stood the test of the time as an unparalleled reference work.

The volume consists of a Bibliography, followed by an Index of Names, an Index of Works and a General Index.
Volume Editors: Barbara Roggema and Alexander Treiger
Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations explores the Arabic translations of the Greek and Syriac Church Fathers, focusing on those produced in the Palestinian monasteries and at Sinai in the 8th–10th centuries and in Antioch during Byzantine rule (969–1084). These Arabic translations preserve patristic texts lost in the original languages. They offer crucial information about the diffusion and influence of patristic heritage among Middle Eastern Christians from the 8th century to the present. A systematic examination of Arabic patristic translations sheds light on the development of Muslim and Jewish theological thought.

Contributors are Aaron Michael Butts, Joe Glynias, Habib Ibrahim, Jonas Karlsson, Sergey Kim, Joshua Mugler, Tamara Pataridze, Alexandre Roberts, Barbara Roggema, Alexander Treiger.
Author: Jonas Karlsson

Abstract

This article presents an overview of the hagiographical sources concerning the East-Syriac saint John of Daylam (ca. 660–738), focusing on the relationship between the three extant Arabic lives and the lives preserved in Syriac, Sogdian, and Ethiopic. One Arabic life is a translation of one of the Syriac lives, another is the Vorlage for the Ethiopic version, while the third is known to us only in Arabic. After presenting the manuscript evidence for each of the lives in its respective language, the complex interconnections between them are briefly discussed.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations

Abstract

This essay explores the Arabic reception of homilies by the Syriac poet Jacob of Serugh (d. 521). More specifically, it argues that at least some of these Arabic homilies are witnessed in distinct textual traditions of Coptic, Melkite, and Syriac Orthodox provenance. The paper includes a survey of previous scholarship on Arabic translations of Jacob, looking at the presentation in Graf’s Geschichte as well as a couple of more recent studies. The bulk of the paper is, however, concerned with the diversity of the Christian Arabic tradition of Jacob, which is investigated through a series of case studies on individual passages.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations
Author: Joe Glynias

Abstract

This paper provides the first study of the only known text produced by a figure of eleventh-century Byzantine Antioch, Yānī ibn al-Duks. This Arabic text is a translation of a homily by Patriarch Germanos I of Constantinople, on the belt and swaddling clothes of Christ. This paper provides the first critical edition of this text, in addition to an in-depth analysis of Yānī’s translation choices, with the goal of offering broader comments about his translation technique. As a whole, this paper hopes to shed light on an unknown figure from the Graeco-Arabic translation movement in eleventh-century Antioch, and offer preliminary answers about the audience of these translated texts.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations
Author: Joshua Mugler

Abstract

This article focuses on a particular translator with some prominence in early eleventh-century Antioch: Ibrāhīm, son of Yūḥannā, an imperial bureaucrat and scribe. A native of Antioch, Ibrāhīm survived the transition from the Muslim rule of the Ḥamdānids to the Byzantine resurgence in Syria, attaining great success within the imperial apparatus of the new rulers. He translated many patristic and medieval works from Greek into Arabic and was likely involved in the imperial project to translate the Constantinopolitan liturgy into Syriac for use in Antioch and its dependencies. We know little about his life apart from autobiographical statements in his one extant original composition, the Life of Christopher, but the available information gives us a rare glimpse into the life of a scholar from this border metropolis at the historical turning point of the tenth and eleventh centuries.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations
Author: Barbara Roggema

Abstract

This chapter explores the Arabic translations of an important late antique Question-and-Answer text, the Quaestiones ad Antiochum ducem (CPG 2257) attributed to Athanasius of Alexandria. It is shown that in the second half of the ninth century CE there was already a complete Arabic translation, of which the surviving manuscripts are older than any of the Greek. This study discusses how the two early recensions are related, what themes the text covers, and how it was used by the earliest Melkite apologists.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations
In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations
Author: Sergey Kim

Résumé

L’ homélie arabe In Nativitatem Domini (CPG 4290) est publiée ici pour la première fois sur la base de huit manuscrits dont le plus ancien date du 12e siècle. Dans l’ introduction l’ attribution du sermon à Sévérien de Gabala († après 407 AD) dans une branche de la tradition manuscrite et à un certain Isaac dans l’ autre est analysée et rejetée. Le vrai auteur du sermon n’ est pas connu, mais son argumentation théologique invite à supposer que le prédicateur était familier avec la littérature chrétienne syriaque. Une traduction française accompagne l’ édition critique du texte arabe.

In: Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations