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ضمن كتاب من تريبوليتانيا إلى أطرابلس، يتناول حافظ عبدولي مسألة انتقال إقليم/كورة طرابلس الغرب من الفترة القديمة المتأخرة إلى الفترة الإسلامية المبكّرة. وذلك وفق مقاربة منهجية تقوم من جهة على مقارعة المعطيات التي توفّرها مختلف المصادر الأدبيّة مع نظيرتها الطوبونيميّة والأونومستكية والأثرية ومن جهة أخرى تعتمد تشبيك المناهج المتنوّعة.
وقد خلص باعتماد هذا المنهج إلى نتائج مجدّدة تستند إلى براهين علميّة تؤكّد – على خلاف ما كان شائعا – أنّ المرور من تريبوليتانيا اللاتينية-المسيحيّة إلى أطرابلس العربية-الإسلامية لم يكن بصفة فجائية عبر إحداث قطيعة فوريّة وهوّة فاصلة بين الفترتين القديمة والوسيطة، بل كان كما الحال في بقيّة مجالات بلاد المغرب تدريجيّا وبطيئا في كل المستويات الحضارية. وقد كانت المسائل المتعلّقة بتفسير كيفية حدوث هذا الانتقال والآليات التي حكمته وانعكاس ذلك على تشكّل المشهد التعميري خلال العصر الوسيط المتقدّم، من أهمّ الهواجس المعرفية التي حاول الكتاب الإجابة عنها.

In From Tripolitania to Tripoli, Hafed Abdouli deals with the transition of Tripolitania from late Antiquity to the early Islamic period. He compares a detailed analysis of all the literary sources with the evaluation of the archaeological, onomastic and toponymic findings. For this purpose, he makes use of various research methodologies.
This approach brings about new results. It confirms that — contrary to what has been so far commonly assumed — the transition from the Latin-Christian Tripolitania to the Arabic-Islamic Tripoli was not sudden. There was no rigorous break that seperated the ancient from the medieval period. On the contrary, as was also the case in the rest of the Maghreb, the transition was progressive and slow at all levels of civilization. The interpretation of how this transition occurred, the mechanisms that determined it, and its reflection on the urban landscape during the early medieval period, are among the most important epistemological concerns that this book tries to answer.
Author:
Arab Traders in their Own Words explores for the first time the largest unified corpus of merchant correspondence to have survived from the Ottoman period. The writers chosen for this first volume were mostly Christian merchants who traded within a network that connected the Syrian and Egyptian provinces and extended from Damascus in the North to Alexandria in the South with particular centers in Jerusalem and Damietta. They lived through one of the most turbulent intersections of Ottoman and European imperial history, the 1790s and early 1800s, and had to navigate their fortunes through diplomacy, culture, and commerce. Besides an edition of more than 190 letters in colloquial Arabic this volume also offers a profound introductory study.
Connected and decompartmentalised perspectives from the Middle East and North Africa (19th-21st century)
Based on a connected, relational and multidisciplinary approach (history, ethnography, political science, and theology), Mission and Preaching tackles the notion of mission through the analysis of preaching activities and religious dynamics across Christianity, Islam and Judaism, in the Middle East and North Africa, from the late 19th century until today. The 13 chapters reveal points of contact, exchange, and circulation, considering the MENA region as a central observatory. The volume offers a new chronology of the missionary phenomenon and calls for further cross-cutting approaches to decompartmentalise it, arguing that these approaches constitute useful entry points to shed new light on religious dynamics and social transformations in the MENA region.

Contributors
Necati Alkan, Federico Alpi, Gabrielle Angey, Armand Aupiais, Katia Boissevain, Naima Bouras, Philippe Bourmaud, Gaetan du Roy, Séverine Gabry-Thienpont, Maria-Chiara Giorda, Bernard Heyberger, Emir Mahieddin, Michael Marten, Norig Neveu, Maria Chiara Rioli, Karène Sanchez Summerer, Heather Sharkey, Ester Sigillò, Sébastien Tank Storper, Emanuela Trevisan Semi, Annalaura Turiano and Vincent Vilmain.