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Series Editors: Yunxiang Yan and Letian Zhang
Chronicles of Contemporary Chinese Social Life includes part of the data collected at the Fudan Data Center for Contemporary Chinese Social Life by Professor Zhang Letian and his team from grassroots society in China, either directly from the owner/author or from collectors who work with the original owner/author. The data is systematic and comprehensive in a self-standing way. All the data that were selected for publication are from a particular rural collective, an urban work-unit, or a residential community and thus reflect the wholeness of the given unit of social life. These data all stretch for a time span of ten years or more, providing enough temporal depth for research and better understanding. These non-aggregated data at the grassroots level systematically reflect the real social life of a particular community over a long time period; they are rich in details for both in-depth case studies and comparative studies. As these kinds of data have never been published before, this publication is truly unique and original.

The targeted readers include China scholars around the world, particularly those whose research focus on contemporary or post-1949 China and/or teaching courses for the same period, graduate students in the same fields for both learning and their own research, and some individuals from the concerned public who want to learn more about Chinese social life by engaging in original and untouched empirical data.
Memory, Movement, and Modernities across Hemispheres
Series Editors:
Richard T. Chu, University of Massachusetts
Augusto F. Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mariam Lam, University of California, Riverside

For some time now, studies on Southeast Asians have often situated the experiences of these peoples within the territorial boundaries of their countries and within the regional framework of Southeast Asia. Geographically fixed to the Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Brunei, East Timor, and Singapore, Southeast Asia emerges, as critical area studies underscore, as a site marked by multivalent politics, histories, and cultures. The processes of globalization, neoliberalism, and war have unmoored such fixities in the Eastern as much as in the Western Hemispheres, causing tectonic shifts in the constructions of memory, massive population movements and migrations, and ever new projects and worldings responding to various regimes of the “modern.” Whereas Southeast Asian studies may remain regionally focused, Southeast Asian American studies must increase its focus on the understudied complex, transnational flows and manifold expressions of the Southeast Asian diasporic experience.

Attendant to the rise of the Southeast Asian diasporas, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (SEAD) provides a peer-reviewed forum for studies that specifically investigate the histories and experiences of Southeast Asian diasporic subjects across hemispheres. We especially invite studies that critically focus on the Southeast Asian experience from a transnational, comparative, and international perspective. SEAD welcomes submissions from a wide array of disciplinary fields (including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, literary studies, and anthropology, among others) that innovatively interrogate themes such as refugees, political asylum, gender/sexuality, colonialism, globalization, empire, nation/nationalism, ethnicity, and transnationalism.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the Publisher, Chunyan Shu.
Author: Reiko YAMATO
East Asian societies have a patri-lineal tradition in which a family successor must be a son and parents live with the heir and his family. In Japan, the patri-lineal family system was prevalent among the samurai warrior class in the early modern period. In the modern period, it was stipulated in the civil code until the end of World War II. This tradition, however, is changing with a background of gender equalization and fewer number of sons resulting from low birth rates. Intergenerational Relationships between Married Children and Their Parents in 21st Century Japan is the first book that introduces a new perspective of the individualized marriage into a study of intergenerational relationships and examines how the patri-lineal tradition is both changing and maintained. This book deals with patri-local coresidence, matri-local nearby-residence, and support exchange between adult children and their parents/ parents-in-law, and offer a new framework for comparative studies of today’s East Asian families.
In China, strong economic growth over the past four decades, accelerated urbanisation and multiple inequalities between urban and rural worlds have driven the escalation of internal and international migrations. The internal migration of workers represents a unique phenomenon since the reform and opening of China. Less-qualified young migrants are living in subaltern conditions and young migrant graduates have strongly internalised the idea of being the "heroes" of the new Chinese society in a context of emotional capitalism. But internal and international migrations intersect and intertwine, young internal and international migrants from China produce economic cosmopolitanisms in Chinese society and through top-down, bottom-up and intermediary globalisation. The young Chinese migrant incarnates the Global Individual, what we labeled here as the Compressed Individual.