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Comparisons – Coalitions – Critiques
Editor-in-Chief:
Political and Public Theologies: Comparisons – Coalitions – Critiques seeks to provide a forum for critical and constructive engagements with the significance of theologies for the public square. Connecting the increasingly interdisciplinary fields of political and public theology, the series is interested in the impact that theologies have on public issues and the impact that public issues have on theologies, both theoretically and practically. PPT invites publications from established and emerging scholars that engage with the significance of theologies for the public square from (1) comparative angles that facilitate inter-religious studies, (2) coalitional angles that foster inter-religious solidarities, and (3) critical angles that re-formulate theology as a resource for contemporary controversies. PPT is published in cooperation with the Centre for Theology and Public Issues (CTPI), University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
Fourteenth-Century Scholar, Bishop, and Polemicist
This book presents an overview together with a detailed examination of the life and ideas of a major thinker and protagonist of the first half of the fourteenth century, Richard FitzRalph (1300-60, Armachanus). A central figure in debates at Oxford, Avignon and Ireland, FitzRalph is perhaps best-known for his central role in the poverty controversies of the 1350s. Each of the chapters collected here sheds a different perspective on the many aspects of FitzRalph’s life and works, from his time at the University of Oxford, his role as preacher and pastoral concerns, his contacts with the Eastern Churches, and finally his case at the Papal court against the privileges granted to the Franciscans. His influence and later reputation is also examined.

Contributors include: Michael W. Dunne, Jean-François Genest†, Michael Haren, Elżbieta Jung, Severin V. Kitanov, Stephen Lahey, Monika Michałowska, Simon Nolan O.Carm, Bridget Riley, Chris Schabel, and John T. Slotemaker
Scholarship has tended to assume that Luther was uninterested in the Greek and Latin classics, given his promotion of the German vernacular and his polemic against the reliance upon Aristotle in theology. But as Athens and Wittenberg demonstrates, Luther was shaped by the classical education he had received and integrated it into his writings. He could quote Epicurean poetry to non-Epicurean ends; he could employ Aristotelian logic to prove the limits of philosophy’s role in theology. This volume explores how Luther and early Protestantism, especially Lutheranism, continued to draw from the classics in their quest to reform the church. In particular, it examines how early Protestantism made use of the philosophy and poetry from classical antiquity.

Contributors include: Joseph Herl, Jane Schatkin Hettrick, E.J. Hutchinson, Jack D. Kilcrease, E. Christian Kopf, John G. Nordling, Piergiacomo Petrioli, Eric G. Phillips, Richard J. Serina, Jr, R. Alden Smith, Carl P.E. Springer, Manfred Svensson, William P. Weaver, and Daniel Zager.
Author:
Tianyi Zhang offers in this study an innovative philosophical reconstruction of Shihāb al-Dīn al-Suhrawardī’s (d. 1191) Illuminationism. Commonly portrayed as either a theosophist or an Avicennian in disguise, Suhrawardī appears here as an original and hardheaded philosopher who adopts mysticism as a tool for philosophical investigation.
Zhang makes use of Plato’s cave allegory to explain Suhrawardī’s Illuminationist project. Focusing on three areas—the theory of presential knowledge, the ontological discussion of mental considerations, and Light Metaphysics—Zhang convincingly reveals the Nominalist and Existential nature of Illuminationism and thereby proposes a new way of understanding how Suhrawardī’s central philosophical ideas cohere.
Volume Editors: and
In 1946 the ‘Lviv Sobor’ voted to liquidate the Ukrainian Greco-Catholic Church. The Moscow Patriarchate considers it a ‘triumph of Orthodoxy,’ while the Catholic Church condemns it as an illegitimate council convened by Soviet authorities. What is the truth? This volume presents the contexts of the ‘Lviv Sobor,’ its aftermath, and reception from various perspectives. Although there is no common narrative, scholars have concluded that the decisions of the ‘Lviv Sobor’ were coerced by Soviet authorities, the Russian Orthodox Church was forced to collaborate, and that reconciliation depends on acknowledging these facts in order to move toward reconciliation.
This book solves the long-standing mystery of a Christian monastery near Samarkand, seen and described by two Arab travellers in the tenth century. Despite several attempts made since the 1890s, its precise location had never been established. The first part covers the quest, the find, and the archaeological excavations’ results. Then the author proceeds to search for a mediaeval Christian enclave near modern Tashkent, which appears to have been washed away by a river that changed its course over centuries.
Apart from the Christians, the book also touches upon the Manichaeans, Buddhists, Zoroastrians and other Sogdians, their languages, faiths, and material remnants.
Stories of Pentecostal conversion and church growth in Roma communities are prolific across Europe but how does conversion impact daily lives in the context of economic hardship and social marginalization? In fact, Roma Pentecostal life stories from Croatia and Serbia reveal both resilience and suffering, and consequently reveal the struggle of lived faith amidst formidable challenges. In what ways, then, has a new Pentecostal identity shifted relationships, thinking, and behaviour? This ethnography explores the ways in which these Roma Pentecostals incorporate their faith in their daily lives through analysing their life stories in conjunction with their socio-cultural contexts and Pentecostal theology.