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Gone But Not Forgotten
Denver’s Chinatown 1875-1900: Gone But Not Forgotten explores the coming of the Chinese to the Western frontier and their experiences in Denver during its early development from a supply station for the mining camps to a flourishing urban center. The complexity of race, class, immigration, politics, and economic policies interacted dynamically and influenced the life of early Chinese settlers in Denver. The Denver Riot, as a consequence of political hostility and racial antagonism against the Chinese, transformed the life of Denver’s Chinese, eventually leading to the disappearance of Denver's Chinatown. But the memory of a neighbored that was part of the colorful and booming urban center remains.
Experiences, Identities and Legacies
Population Displacement in Lithuania in the XXth Century: Experiences, Identities and Legacies is an edited volume written by historians from several countries offering a series of ground-breaking case studies on forced migration in Lithuania during and between the two World Wars. Starting with the premise that the mass movement of peoples during and after the Second World War needs to be understood in relation to the population displacement of the First World War, the authors draw on theoretical perspectives ranging from entangled histories, cultural theory and studies of nationalism to trace the ethnic, social and cultural transformation of Lithuanian society caused by the displacement of Lithuanians, Poles, Jews and Germans.

Contributors are: Tomas Balkelis, Daiva Dapkutė, Violeta Davoliūtė, Andrea Griffante, Ruth Leiserowitz, Klaus Richter, Vasilijus Safronovas, Vitalija Stravinskienė, Arūnas Streikus and Theodore R. Weeks.
Transcription and Translation of an Illustrated Late Sixteenth-Century Spanish Manuscript Concerning the Geography, History and Ethnography of the Pacific, South-east and East Asia
In The Boxer Codex, the editors have transcribed, translated and annotated an illustrated late-16th century Spanish manuscript. It is a special source that provides evidence for understanding early-modern geography, ethnography and history of parts of the western Pacific, as well as major segments of maritime and continental South-east Asia and East Asia. Although portions of this gem of a manuscript have been known to specialists for nearly seven decades, this is the first complete transcription and English translation, with critical annotations and apparatus, and reproductions of all its illustrations, to appear in print.
People en Route to Socio-Cultural and Economic Transformations
This book brings together in a comparative analysis the results of studies of the various cultural, social, economic and historical aspects that are formative in African societies’ experiences of how people negotiated the spaces and times of being in transit on the road to prosperity.
The book analyses the various outcomes of the process of mobility and the experience of spaces and times of transit across gender, generational, and class-differences. These experiences are explored and give insight into the socio-cultural and economics transformations that have taken place in African societies in the past century.

Contributors are:
Akinyinka Akinyoade, Walter van Beek, Marleen Dekker, Ton Dietz, Rijk van Dijk, Isaie Dougnon, Jan-Bart Gewald, Meike de Goede, Benjamin Kofi Nyarko, Samuel Ntewusu Aniegye, Taiwo Olabisi Oluwatoyin, Shehu Tijjani Yusuf, Augustine Tanle and Amisah Zenabu Bakuri.

In European Cities in the Modern Era, 1850-1914 Friedrich Lenger analyses the demographic and economic preconditions of European urbanization, compares the extent to which Europe’s cities were characterized by heterogeneity with respect to the social, national and religious composition of its population and asks in which way differences resulting from this heterogeneity were resolved either peacefully or violently.

Using this general perspective and extending the scope by including Eastern and Southern Europe the dominant view of Europe’s prewar cities as islands of modernity is challenged and the ubiquity of urban violence established as a central analytical problem.
The Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies was founded in 1995, basing itself at the Institute of Germanic Studies of the University of London. Dr Anthony Grenville became Chairman of the Research Centre, whose members are Professor Charmian Brinson, Professor Richard Dove, Dr Marian Malet, Dr Jennifer Taylor, Dr Jana Buresova, Rachel Dickson, Dr Andrea Hammel, Dr Bea Lewkowicz, Sarah MacDougall, Dr Anna Nyburg, Professor Andrea Reiter and Professor Ian Wallace, with Dr Malet and Dr Taylor as Honorary Secretary. The aim of the Research Centre is to promote research in the field of German-speaking exiles in Great Britain. To this end it organises conferences and publishes their proceedings, holds research seminars, and publishes its own peer-reviewed Yearbook. Its members cooperate in the writing of scholarly studies, including a book about the German-speaking refugees from Hitler in Britain, Changing Countries, and a study of the Austrian Centre in London, 1939-47. Though the Research Centre has primarily concerned itself with the German-speaking refugees from Nazism in Britain, it aims to extend its scope to include German-speaking exiles of other periods and comparable groups such as the Czech refugees from Hitler or Italian anti-Fascists. Given its location near the heart of the principal centre of settlement of the refugees from Germany, the Research Centre readily provides advice and useful contacts to scholars and postgraduates working in the field.

The editors welcome contributions relating to any aspect of the field of German-speaking exile in Great Britain, not limited to the refugees from Hitler in the mid-twentieth century. Articles should be sent on disk and in hard copy to the Hon. Secretary, Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU. A style sheet is available from the Hon. Secretary.

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The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.