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Gijsbert Jonkers

In The Textual Tradition of Plato's Timaeus and Critias, Gijsbert Jonkers provides new insights into the extant ancient and medieval evidence for the text of both Platonic dialogues. The discussions are set in the broader context of examinations in recent decades of the textual traditions of other individual Platonic works. Particularly the vast collection of testimonia of the Timaeus, one of Plato's most read, interpreted and discussed dialogues of all times, will be of interest for students of ancient philosophy, science and philology.

Series:

Edited by Sharon Weisser and Naly Thaler

Strategies of Polemics in Greek and Roman Philosophy brings together papers written by specialists in the field of ancient philosophy on the topic of polemics. Despite the central role played by polemics in ancient philosophy, the forms and mechanisms of philosophical polemics are not usually the subject of systematic scholarly attention. The present volume seeks to shed new light on familiar texts by approaching them from this neglected angle. The contributions address questions such as: What is the role of polemic in a philosophical discourse? What were the polemical strategies developed by ancient philosophers? To what extent did polemics contribute to the shaping of important philosophical doctrines or standpoint?

Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Sophistry in the High Roman Empire

Maximus of Tyre and Twelve Other Intellectuals

Series:

Jeroen Lauwers

How is it possible that modern scholars have labelled Maximus of Tyre, a second-century CE performer of philosophical orations, as a sophist or a ‘half-philosopher’, while his own self-presentation is that of a genuine philosopher? If we take Maximus’ claim to philosophical authority seriously, his case can deepen our understanding of the dynamic nature of Imperial philosophy. Through a discursive analysis of twelve Imperial intellectuals alongside Maximus’ dialexeis, the author proposes an interpretative framework to assess the purpose behind the representation of philosophy, rhetoric, and sophistry in Maximus’ oeuvre. This is thus as yet the first book-length attempt at situating the historical communication process implicit in the surviving Maximean texts in the concurrent context of the Imperial intellectual world.

'Anonymus Aurelianensis III' in Aristotelis Analytica priora

Critical edition, Introduction, Notes, and Indexes

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Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist

This is the first critical edition of the earliest known Latin commentary on Aristotle’s Prior Analytics, the Anonymus Aurelianensis III. In addition to the critical text, Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist’s edition contains a comparative analysis of the anonymous commentary and the extant Greek commentaries as well as a full comparison between Boethius’ translation and the translation used by the commentator. The edition provides a solid foundation for further study on the earliest medieval exegesis on the Prior Analytics and is an essential resource for any scholar who wants to learn more about the development of logic in general and the medieval reception of Aristotelian syllogistic in particular.

The Space of Time

A Sensualist Interpretation of Time in Augustine, Confessions X to XII

Series:

David van Dusen

From Robert Grosseteste to Jean-François Lyotard, Augustine’s suggestion that time is a “dilation of the soul” ( distentio animi) has been taken up as a seminal and controversial time-concept, yet in The Space of Time, David van Dusen argues that this ‘dilation’ has been fundamentally misinterpreted.
Time in Confessions XI is a dilation of the senses—in beasts, as in humans. And Augustine’s time-concept in Confessions XI is not Platonic—but in schematic terms, Epicurean.
Identifying new influences on the Confessions—from Aristoxenus to Lucretius—while keeping Augustine’s phenomenological interpreters in view, The Space of Time is a path-breaking work on Confessions X to XII and a ranging contribution to the history of the concept of time.

Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition

Introduction to Reading Avicenna's Philosophical Works. Second, Revised and Enlarged Edition, Including an Inventory of Avicenna’s Authentic Works

Dimitri Gutas

Through close study of Avicenna's statements and major works, Dimitri Gutas traces Avicenna's own sense of his place in the Aristotelian tradition and the history of philosophy in Islam, and provides an introduction to reading his philosophical works by delineating the approach most consistent with Avicenna's intention and purpose in philosophy. The second edition of this foundational work, which has quickened fruitful research into the philosopher in the last quarter century, is completely revised and updated, and adds a new final chapter summarizing Avicenna's philosophical project. It is also enlarged with the addition of a new appendix which offers a critical inventory of Avicenna's authentic works, updating the work of Mahdavi (1954) with additional information on all manuscripts and important editions and translations. Its usefulness enhanced, the book provides primary orientation to Avicenna's philosophy and works and constitutes an indispensable research tool for their study.

Winner of the I. R. Iran World Award for the Book of the Year 2014

Méthexis

International Journal for Ancient Philosophy

Founded in 1988 by Conrado Eggers Lan (Universidad de Buenos Aires), Méthexis seeks to promote studies and research in the history of ancient philosophy (throughout the course of its development), so as to offer scholars a venue for discussing and comparing their results. Within this general framework, the journal stands out on account of two distinguishing features: 1) it welcomes, or indeed solicits, contributions reflecting different schools of thought and methodological approaches, be they analytical, hermeneutical, historical or chiefly philological contributions; 2) the journal values the wide range of national traditions, including – as far as this is possible – from a linguistic perspective, as it accepts contributions in five languages (English, French, German, Italian and Spanish); by doing so, the journal seeks to present itself as an “international” publication, in the strictest sense of the term.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Méthexis can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Phronesis

A Journal for Ancient Philosophy

Founded in 1955, Phronesis is the leading international journal dealing specifically with the study of ancient Greek and Roman thought (ancient philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology, logic and the philosophy of science and medicine) from its origins down to the end of the sixth century A.D. Phronesis offers the reader specialist articles and book notes from top international scholars. It publishes work in English, French, German, Italian and Latin. All queries regarding new submission should be directed to Professor George Boys-Stones. Please see the Instructions for Authors below.
European Science Foundation Ranking A.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Phronesis can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Editor-in-Chief Thornton C. Lockwood

Polis (AGPT) was founded in 1977 to provide a forum for publication to scholars specializing in what was then a neglected sub-field – ancient Greek political thought. In the years since, Polis has expanded its coverage to include Hellenistic and Roman political thought. Over the years Polis evolved into a fully-fledged academic journal that publishes material of interest to those who study ancient Greek and Roman political thought broadly understood, whether they do so as classicists, ancient historians, philosophers, intellectual historians, or political scientists. Polis also welcomes articles on the reception of ancient Greek and Roman political thought in Europe, America, or elsewhere. Since its inception the journal speaks for no particular perspective or methodology and it is devoted to the publication of original papers, even though extensive literature reviews, critiques of contemporary research, and review essays are also included.

Polis publishes contributions written in English, French and German. Submissions are peer-reviewed, and an editorial decision is made on the basis of these reviews. The views and opinions expressed in peer-reviewed articles published in Polis are those of the authors and do not reflect the position of the journal.