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Abstract

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict involves not only territorial disputes, but also contested identities and competing narratives. Dialogue encounters between Israeli-Jews and Palestinians aim to bridge the gap between identities and narratives through intergroup contact. These encounters are largely identified with secular and leftist values, while religious Jews are often associated with a more hawkish and less conciliatory position. This study explores through qualitative methods and in-depth interviews the participation of Israeli-Jews from the Religious Zionism camp in dialogue encounters with Palestinians. Religious Zionism is a subgroup of Orthodox Judaism which attributes religious significance to the modern State of Israel.

Our findings indicate that the encounter between the beliefs of our religious Zionist Jewish-Israeli interviewees and Palestinian narratives elicits dilemmas. On a broader level, this study contributes to our understanding of the ways in which this specific ideological and social background affects perception changes during dialogue encounters. It also contributes to expanding our knowledge on the relationship between religious norms and ideology, as well as social and psychological elements of the participation of religious Zionist Israel-Jews in dialogue encounters with Palestinians.

In: Jews in Dialogue

Abstract

Adrienne Rich, one of the most accomplished American poets, lesbian feminists and critics, has published more than fifteen volumes of poetry and several collections of essays. A persisting feature in most of her works is the interweaving and interaction of poetry, history and politics. She was not so “political” in her early writings in 1950s as in her mid and late writings. Her radical lesbian-feminist voice was prevailing in her writings of 1970s like Diving into the Wreck (1973), Of Woman Born: Motherhood as an Experience and Institution (1976), and The Dream of a Common Language (1978). And in the 1980s, the central themes of her later poetry are the problems of national and ethnic identity (especially Jewishness), history, death and the passing of time. As a daughter of a Gentile mother and a Jewish father who is not so willing to acknowledge his Jewish identity, Rich’s poems and her own life experiences are mostly bound around conflicting themes of identity and assimilation. Indeed, she discusses the political, historical and biographical realities in her poems. Rich regrets the muteness of Jewishness in her family and she suffers from a sense of guilt and fury with the absence of Jewish education in her family. This article shows how Rich’s biographical experience, her Jewish roots and the Holocaust are displayed in two of her testimonial poems “Sources” and “Contradiction.”

In: Jews in Dialogue

Abstract

This article has a twofold aim: historical and practical. First, it conducts a brief historical review of the Jewish community in Serbia, addressing the ways in which this community has contributed to country’s culture, history, sciences, politics, and social life. It focuses especially on Jewish life in Serbia after the Holocaust, and the various difficulties of assimilation and emigration. Second, the essay investigates the practical realities of interculturalism in Serbia, weighing these realities against concerns about preserving Jewish identity. The article stems from three interviews: Stefan Sablić, theater director, musician, and founder of Shira U’tfila; Sonja Viličić, activist and founder/director ofNGOHaver Serbia; Dragana Stojanović, anthropologist and scholar of cultural studies. Taken together, the responses of these speakers offer novel approaches to multiculturalism and intercultural dialogue in an area with a complex history and cultural makeup.

In: Jews in Dialogue
A Comparative Theology of Divine Possessions
In Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation, Joshua Samuel constructs an embodied comparative theology of liberation by comparing divine possessions among Hindu and Christian Dalits in South India. Critiquing the problems inherent in prioritizing texts when studying religious traditions, Samuel calls for the need to engage in body and people centered interreligious learning. This comparative theological reading of ecstatic experiences of the divine in Dalit bodies in Hinduism and Christianity brings out the powerful liberative potential inherent in the bodies of the oppressed, enabling us to identify alternative modes of resistance and new avenues of liberation among those who are dehumanized and discriminated, and to find deeper and meaningful ways of speaking about God in the context of oppression.
In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation
In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation
In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation
In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation
In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation
In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation