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Various Authors & Editors

Missionary Archives - Asia
South-East Asia

The importance of missionary archives as a primary resource continues to grow as their value for the study of a variety of scholarly disciplines and subjects becomes ever more widely recognized. Missionary Archives on Asia is now available. It consists of four sections: East, South, South East Asia (each subdivided by country), and an Asia General section.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives - Asia collection.

Various Authors & Editors

Presbyterian Church of England Foreign Missions Archives, 1847-1950

Correspondence, minutes, records, reports, and papers relating to each of the foreign missions as well as the home base of the Foreign Missions Committee and the Women's Missionary Association of the Presbyterian Church of England.

This collection is also included in the Missionary Archives collection.

Various Authors & Editors

Missionary Travels
Asia (General)

Travel accounts and travelogues dating from the 16th to 19th centuries. Collection includes reports of missionary reports, accounts of pilgrimages, educational voyages, artisan's wanderings, concrete data and statistics, descriptions of resorts, spas, courts and curiosities, anecdotes and social commentaries. The literature documents European mentalities and the dynamics of intercultural encounters (that sometimes resulted in collisions).

This collection is also included in the Missionary Travels collection.

Various Authors & Editors

Missionary Travels
Central Asia

Travel accounts and travelogues dating from the 16th to 19th centuries. Collection includes reports of missionary reports, accounts of pilgrimages, educational voyages, artisan's wanderings, concrete data and statistics, descriptions of resorts, spas, courts and curiosities, anecdotes and social commentaries. The literature documents European mentalities and the dynamics of intercultural encounters (that sometimes resulted in collisions).

This collection is also included in the Missionary Travels collection.

Series:

Charles Willemen, Bart Dessein and Collett Cox

This volume deals with the Sarvāstivāda school of Buddhism, the major philosophical school of Hīnayāna. First a general outline is given of the school's origin in the (Indian) Buddhist synods. Part one ends with a general survey of Sarvāstivāda Literature.
In the actual corpus the philosophical texts of Sarvāstivāda are treated in detail. The organization of the work follows the geographical spread of Sarvāstivāda. In these Parts special emphasis is laid on the Central Asian history of the school, as well as on how the school eventually reached China ('Abhidharma and Kosa Schools'). Treatment is based on the Chinese versions of the major works of the school (Sūtrapiṭaka, Abhidarmapiṭaka and Vinayapiṭaka).
All in all, this major work throws a new light on the relationship between Sarvāstivāda and Mūlasarvāstivāda and provides an innovative view on the Dārsṭtantika and Sautrāntika Schools.

Series:

Liu

The history of the Madhyamaka, one of the two main Indian Mahāyāna Buddhist philosophical traditions, began around the second century A.D. with the appearance of the writings of Nāgārjuna and Nāgārjuna's followers. Several of these writings were transmitted to China in the first decade of the fifth century, and had exerted a considerable influence on the development of Chinese Buddhist thought. This book examines the three stages of development of Chinese Madhyamaka, focussing attention on the different ways the representative figures of each stage applied basic Madhyamaka principles to deal with the central Buddhist doctrinal issues of their age.
The chief aim of this book is to locate an ideological nucleus and to trace a general pattern of transformation, referring to which the precise significance of the key theoretical elements and the exact relationship between the main doctrinal aspects of a broad Buddhist intellectual trend can be clearly demonstrated and accurately defined.

Series:

Thursby

The Sikhs is a photographic study of the religious practices of contemporary Sikh people in Delhi and the Punjab region of northern India. Sixty-six photographs comprise the 'visual text' for this contribution to the Iconography of Religions series. They depict traditional sites and places of worship, major festivals, rites of the life cycle, symbols of Khalsa membership and artistic representations of great martyrs and the Sikh spiritual masters. The photographic subjects are documented in a catalogue of illustrations, and information needed to appreciate their historical background and current significance is provided in an introductory essay. The aim is to present, in terms acceptable to Sikhs and non-Sikhs alike, characteristic aspects of present-day Sikh religious life. This phenomenological approach is organized along patterns provided by Sikh concepts, and so far as possible it places emphasis on positive points of contact between proponents of Sikh faith and practitioners of modern critical scholarship.

Series:

Chattopadhyay

Brahmasūtras [BS] is a corpus of Vedānta. Although an interpretation of the central teachings of Upanisads, BS has itself been a subject of numerous hermeneutical forays. It somehow suited the Orientalist and Hindu scholars since the early 19th century to promote one interpretation of this seminal text, viz., from the monistic view of Advaita. Radically different trajectories of Hindu cultural selfunderstanding were by and large ignored: one re-interpretative attempt comes from the Vaisṇava followers of Śrī Caintanya.
Sri Rampada Chattopadhyay in this volume attempts such a novel reading. His basic thesis is: the Bhāgavata Purāṇa or Śrīmad Bhāgavāta, a key scripture in Vaisṇava theology, was the best available commentary on the original BS. In other words, as Professor Matilal explains in his Preface, in order to understand the theistic and devotional nature of religious philosophy that underlies Vedānta, one has to depend upon the theological teachings of the Bhāgavata.
Chattopadhyay draws on these teachings to correlate with issues pondered upon in the Upanisads, and their subsequent influence on Vedānta, the Brahmasūtras in particular. He follows the traditional pattern of commenting on each section and chapter according to which the sūtras have been devided. While copiously elucidating on the Vaisṇava approach, he engages in criticism of Śaṁkara and other Vedānta commentators on BS. The book is of immense importance to scholars and students in this late phase of Indian thought.

Series:

Razia Akter

This study, done within the comprehensive Weberian framework, focuses on religion and social change in Bangladesh through an imaginative use of qualitative as well as quantitative methods of modern social research.
It first provides a sociological interpretation of the origin and development of Islam in Bengal using historical and literary works on Bengal. The main contribution is based on two sample surveys conducted by Mrs. Banu in 20 villages of Bangladesh and in three areas in the metropolitan Dhaka city. Using these survey data, she gives a sociological analysis of Islamic religious beliefs and practices in contemporary Bangladesh, and more importantly, she studies the impact of the Islamic religious beliefs on the socio- economic development and political culture in present-day Bangladesh. She also shows how Islam compares with modern education in social 'transforming capacity'.
This careful and rigorous work is a notable contribution to sociology of religion and helps to deepen our understanding of the interactions between religious and social changes common to many parts of the Third World.

Series:

Ian Harris

In the past European scholars have tended to treat both Madhyamaka and Yogācāra as separate and fundamentally opposed trends in Mahāyāna Buddhist thought.
Drawing heavily on early textual evidence this work questions the validity of such a "Mahāyāna schools" hypothesis.
By down-playing the late commentorial traditions, the author attempts a general reappraisal of the epistemological and ontological writings of Nagarjuna, Asanga and Vasubandhu. He concludes that the overlap in all areas of doctrine is significant, but particularly with respect to the teachings on the levels of truth, the enlightened and unenlightened states, the status of language and the nature of reality.
It is hoped that such investigations may provide the basis for a new theory on the proliferation of Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism as an organic process of assimilation to new audiences, and specific contemporary problems, rather than in the more schismatic manner favoured by past researchers.