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Volume Editors: Alexander Chow and Emma Wild-Wood
‘Ecumenism’ and ‘independency’ suggest two distinct impulses in the history of Christianity: the desire for unity, co-operation, connectivity, and shared belief and practice, and the impulse for distinction, plurality, and contextual translation. Yet ecumenism and independency are better understood as existing in critical tension with one another. They provide a way of examining changes in World Christianity. Taking their lead from the internationally acclaimed research of Brian Stanley, in whose honour this book is published, contributors examine the entangled nature of ecumenism and independency in the modern global history of Christianity. They show how the scrutiny afforded by the attention to local, contextual approaches to Christianity outside the western world, may inform and enrich the attention to transnational connectivity.
Author: Mark Noll

Abstract

This paper surveys thirteen events that took place in various locations around the world in 1899 and 1900 keyed, not to historiographical traditions featuring Europe and North America, but anticipating the de-centered and pan-global histories that Brian Stanley has so capably promoted and exemplified. A few of the events taking place at the turn of the century do, in fact, fit easily into a traditional framework (the first Latin American Bishops’ Plenary Council, the New York City Ecumenical Missionary Conference, the publication of Adolf von Harnack’s What Is Christianity?). But from the perspective of the twenty-first century, and reflecting the new situation for world Christianity that came into existence during the twentieth century, many other signal events during those axial years foresaw a different kind of history. This alternative history will come into view through brief examination of Catholic and Protestant missions in Oceania, activities leading to the founding of the Gideons and the Indian Missionary Society of Tinnevelly, the appointment of William Wadé Harris as an official interpreter in Liberia, Dora Yu’s return to Korea for further missionary service, the opening of Mukti Sadan by Pandita Ramabai at Khedgaon southeast of Bombay, and similar apparently out-of-the-way occurrences. By underscoring the importance of initiatives that led on to the great expansion of ecclesiastical independence in the Christian world, along with other initiatives anticipating hitherto unknown forms of ecumenical cooperation, this stereoptic survey pays tribute to Brian Stanley for leading the way, while also indicating something about the developing character of the new world history of Christianity.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
Author: Mark Noll

Abstract

This paper surveys thirteen events that took place in various locations around the world in 1899 and 1900 keyed, not to historiographical traditions featuring Europe and North America, but anticipating the de-centered and pan-global histories that Brian Stanley has so capably promoted and exemplified. A few of the events taking place at the turn of the century do, in fact, fit easily into a traditional framework (the first Latin American Bishops’ Plenary Council, the New York City Ecumenical Missionary Conference, the publication of Adolf von Harnack’s What Is Christianity?). But from the perspective of the twenty-first century, and reflecting the new situation for world Christianity that came into existence during the twentieth century, many other signal events during those axial years foresaw a different kind of history. This alternative history will come into view through brief examination of Catholic and Protestant missions in Oceania, activities leading to the founding of the Gideons and the Indian Missionary Society of Tinnevelly, the appointment of William Wadé Harris as an official interpreter in Liberia, Dora Yu’s return to Korea for further missionary service, the opening of Mukti Sadan by Pandita Ramabai at Khedgaon southeast of Bombay, and similar apparently out-of-the-way occurrences. By underscoring the importance of initiatives that led on to the great expansion of ecclesiastical independence in the Christian world, along with other initiatives anticipating hitherto unknown forms of ecumenical cooperation, this stereoptic survey pays tribute to Brian Stanley for leading the way, while also indicating something about the developing character of the new world history of Christianity.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity

Abstract

This chapter examines the many independent activities by tenacious Pentecostal missionaries that resulted in the formation of Chinese Pentecostal Churches. It reveals the individual, and often obscure, stories of western and Chinese Christians in the early twentieth century who were united in their commitment to evangelism. Pentecostal mission flourished in northern and inland China through a shared expectation of revival and, increasingly, a recognition of the necessity of organisational structures to sustain missionary activities.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity

Abstract

This chapter examines the many independent activities by tenacious Pentecostal missionaries that resulted in the formation of Chinese Pentecostal Churches. It reveals the individual, and often obscure, stories of western and Chinese Christians in the early twentieth century who were united in their commitment to evangelism. Pentecostal mission flourished in northern and inland China through a shared expectation of revival and, increasingly, a recognition of the necessity of organisational structures to sustain missionary activities.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
Author: Ian Randall

Abstract

From early in the twentieth century there was a Baptist Students’ Society in Cambridge University, entitled the Robert Hall Society. A prime mover in the formation of the Baptist Society was T.R. Glover, who became Public Orator in the University, and a best-selling scm (Student Christian Movement) author. In the period I will examine, from the 1920s to the 1940s, there were issues in the Robert Hall Society connected with the relationship between Baptist denominational convictions and ecumenical dimensions, especially represented by scm. The Robert Hall Society had a significant influence on Cambridge students who became involved in it and who went on to take various roles in Baptist and wider Christian life. International aspects are also involved, mostly through the Baptist Missionary Society, whose representatives came to speak in Robert Hall meetings, and through Baptist students who later went overseas. In the 1940s the Robert Hall Society felt the impact of the new evangelical movement of the time and I will explore that. The archives of the Robert Hall Society are held in Cambridge. They provide a full picture and they have not been utilised before.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
Author: Ian Randall

Abstract

From early in the twentieth century there was a Baptist Students’ Society in Cambridge University, entitled the Robert Hall Society. A prime mover in the formation of the Baptist Society was T.R. Glover, who became Public Orator in the University, and a best-selling scm (Student Christian Movement) author. In the period I will examine, from the 1920s to the 1940s, there were issues in the Robert Hall Society connected with the relationship between Baptist denominational convictions and ecumenical dimensions, especially represented by scm. The Robert Hall Society had a significant influence on Cambridge students who became involved in it and who went on to take various roles in Baptist and wider Christian life. International aspects are also involved, mostly through the Baptist Missionary Society, whose representatives came to speak in Robert Hall meetings, and through Baptist students who later went overseas. In the 1940s the Robert Hall Society felt the impact of the new evangelical movement of the time and I will explore that. The archives of the Robert Hall Society are held in Cambridge. They provide a full picture and they have not been utilised before.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity