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In Pilgrimage and Economy in the Ancient Mediterranean, Anna Collar and Troels Myrup Kristensen bring together diverse scholarship to explore the socioeconomic dynamics of ancient Mediterranean pilgrimage from archaic Greece to Late Antiquity, the Greek mainland to Egypt and the Near East. This broad chronological and geographical canvas demonstrates how our modern concepts of religion and economy were entangled in the ancient world. By taking material culture as a starting point, the volume examines the ways that landscapes, architecture, and objects shaped the pilgrim’s experiences, and the manifold ways in which economy, belief and ritual behaviour intertwined, specifically through the processes and practices that were part of ancient Mediterranean pilgrimage over the course of more than 1,500 years.
In The Cave 3 Copper Scroll: A Symbolic Journey, Jesper Høgenhavn presents a reading of the Copper Scroll as a literary text. For more than 60 years, scholars have debated whether or not the treasures recorded here reflect historical realities. This study argues that the dichotomy between “facts” and “fiction” is inadequate for a proper understanding of the Copper Scroll. The document was designed to convey specific images to its readers, thus staying true to the format of an instruction for retrieving hidden treasures. Yet, the evoked landscape is dense with symbolical associations, and the journey through it reflects deliberate narrative patterns. The scroll was written against the background of the social and political turmoil of Jewish Palestine in the 1st century CE, and reflects contemporary concerns and interests.
The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood throws fresh light on narratives about Christian holy men and women from Late Antiquity to Byzantium. Rather than focusing on the relationship between story and reality, it asks what literary choices authors made in depicting their heroes and heroines: how they positioned the narrator, how they responded to existing texts, how they utilised or transcended genre conventions for their own purposes, and how they sought to relate to their audiences. The literary focus of the chapters assembled here showcases the diversity of hagiographical texts written in Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Syriac, as well as pointing out the ongoing conversations that connect them. By asking these questions of this diverse group of texts, it illuminates the literary development of hagiography in the late antique, Byzantine, and medieval periods.

Abstract

Recent years have seen a growing interest in Patristic “angelomorphic pneumatology”, a phrase used mostly to describe early pre-Nicene portrayals of the Holy Spirit. While not denying the existence of such pneumatologies or their shared theological character as observed by scholars of angelomorphic pneumatology, this article seeks to challenge the appropriateness of term “angelomorphic” in a pneumatological context, particularly against the backdrop of its original Christological usage. This study takes as an example Origen of Alexandria, whose pneumatology is not considered “angelomorphic” by the standards of current definitions, but contains certain undeniable features of this angelomorphic theological tradition.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood