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Huguenot Sermons and the Shaping of Confessional Identity, 1629-1685
In Preaching a Dual Identity, Nicholas Must examines seventeenth-century Huguenot sermons to study the development of French Reformed confessional identity under the Edict of Nantes. Of key concern is how a Huguenot hybrid identity was formulated by balancing a strong sense of religious particularism with an enthusiastic political loyalism. Must argues that sermons were an integral part of asserting this unique confessional position in both their preached and printed forms. To demonstrate this, Must explores a variety of sermon themes to access the range of images and arguments that preachers employed to articulate a particular vision of their community as a religious minority in France.
This book represents a multi-disciplinary approach to the problem of the Jews and the German Reformation. The contributions come from both senior and emerging scholars, from North America, Israel, and Europe, to ensure a breadth in perspective. The essays in this volume are arranged under four broad headings: 1. The Road to the Reformation (late medieval theology and the humanists and the Jews), 2. The Reformers and the Jews (essays on Luther, Melanchthon, Bucer, Zwingli, Calvin, Osiander, the Catholic Reformers, and the Radical Reformers), 3. Representations of Jews and Judaism (the portrayal of Judaism as a religion, images of the Jews in the visual arts, and in sixteenth-century German literature), and 4. Jewish Responses to the Reformation.

Contributors include: Dean Phillip Bell, Jay Berkovitz, Robert Bireley, Stephen G. Burnett, Elisheva Carlebach, Achim Detmers, Yaacov Deutsch, Maria Diemling, Michael Driedger, R. Gerald Hobbs, Joy Kammerling, Thomas Kaufmann, Hans-Martin Kirn, Christopher Ocker, Erika Rummel, Petra Schöner, Timothy J. Wengert, and Edith Wenzel.