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Essays in Honor of Everett K. Rowson
This volume brings together studies that explore the richness of the Arabic literary tradition and of Islamic intellectual life, from the beginnings of Islam to the present. The contributors cover an unusually wide range of subjects, including such topics as guile in the Quran, marriage in Islamic law, early esoterica, commentaries on al-Ḥarīrī’s Maqamāt, Hellenistic philosophy in Arabic, medieval music and song, scurrilous poetry, Arabic rhetoric, cursing, the modern social and legal history of the Middle East, al-Kharrat’s modernist project, and contemporary Islamic thought and responses to it.

The volume’s range reflects the enormous breadth of Everett Rowson’s scholarship and his impact over a lifetime of publishing, editing, teaching, and mentoring in the many fields that constitute the Arabic humanities and Islamic thought.

Contributors: Ali Humayun Akhtar, Thomas Bauer, Hans Hinrich Biesterfeldt, Kevin van Bladel, Marilyn Booth, Michael Cooperson, Kenneth M. Cuno, Geert Jan van Gelder, Hala Halim, Lara Harb, David Hollenberg, Matthew L. Keegan, David Larsen, Joseph E. Lowry, Zainab Mahmood, Jon McGinnis, Jeannie Miller, John Nawas, Bilal Orfali, Alex Popovkin, Dwight F. Reynolds, Susan A. Spectorsky, Tara Stephan, Adam Talib, Sarra Tlili, Shawkat M. Toorawa, James Toth, Mark S. Wagner.
In the medieval, late medieval and pre-modern world of Islam, Muslims, Jews and Christians constituted a unique cultural and intellectual commonality. They shared a language, Arabic (and at times Persian), which they spoke in daily life and which they also used for their theological, philosophical, legal and scientific writings. Moreover, they often read the same books, so that a continuous, multi-dimensional exchange of ideas, texts, and forms of discourse was the norm rather than the exception.While this has been amply demonstrated for some selected periods and regions, scholars usually opt for a one-dimensional approach with an (often exclusive) focus on either Muslim, Jewish or Christian authors and their writings.
The journal Intellectual History of the Islamicate World was founded in 2013 by Sabine Schmidtke as a forum for research that systematically crosses the boundaries between three major disciplines of academia and research, viz. Islamic Studies, Jewish Studies and the study of Eastern Christianity. It encourages discussion among representatives of these and related disciplines, with a view to promoting a new understanding of intellectual history in all its facets throughout the Islamicate World, from its emergence until modern times and from different methodological perspectives. The Intellectual History of the Islamicate World covers such themes as philosophy, theology, exegesis, law and legal methodology, sciences and medicine.
The Intellectual History of the Islamicate World is double blind peer-reviewed. In addition to predefined theme volumes, the journal accepts submissions relevant to its overall concerns but not bound to a specific theme. Articles for publication in Intellectual History of the Islamicate World should be submitted through Editorial Manager at www.editorialmanager.com/IHIW.
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